Category Archives: Where to Eat?

Our 50 Favorite Restaurants

In Any Category: Top 10 Favorite Restaurants in Paris

  1. Septime
  2. Restaurant David Toutain
  3. Sola
  4. Au Passage
  5. Verjus
  6. Restaurant Frenchie
  7. Clamato
  8. Juveniles
  9. Le Griffonier
  10. Le Cinq

Classic Bistro

  1. Juveniles
  2. Le Griffonier
  3. Philou
  4. Chez Michel
  5. Bistrot Paul Bert
  6. Bistro Bellet
  7. Chez l’Ami Jean
  8. Terroir Parisien
  9. L’Assiette
  10. Chez Georges

Modern French

  1. Restaurant David Toutain
  2. Sola
  3. Verjus
  4. Restaurant Frenchie
  5. Le Chateaubriand
  6. Spring
  7. Porte 12
  8. Akrame
  9. Pirouette
  10. Clover

Extremely Difficult to Book

  1. Septime 
  2. Restaurant Frenchie
  3. Abri
  4. Yam’tcha
  5. Le Chateaubriand

Small Sharable Plates

  1. Au Passage
  2. Ellsworth
  3. Yard Wine Bar
  4. Clamato
  5. Gare au Gorille

Especially Good at Lunch

  1. Table
  2. Semilla
  3. Le Baratin
  4. Le Servan
  5. Le Galopin

Haute Cuisine

  1. Le Cinq
  2. Pierre Gagnaire
  3. Ledoyen
  4. L’Arpège
  5. L’Ambroisie

Cheap Comforts

  1. Breizh Café
  2. Frenchie To Go
  3. Crêperie Josselin
  4. Holybelly
  5. L’As du Falafel

Simple Food & Excellent Wine

  1. Café de la Nouvelle Mairie
  2. Les Papilles
  3. Le Repaire de Cartouche
  4. À La Renaissance
  5. Retro’bottega

Laurent Favre-Mot

Between the chocolate mustache-topped sable sandwich cookies that resemble an inside-out Oreo, the “f*cking dark” chocolate tarts topped off with chocolate skulls, or a lemon cream in between sesame madeleines disguised as a hamburger, this pastry shop can feel a bit too self-consciously cool. Thankfully, the sweets mostly deliver, and the tattooed and beardedeponymous pastry chef is present most days, and gracious. The deconstructed cheesecake inside of a Camembert box is an interesting take on a ubiquitous dessert, and the fresh fig tart with dragées rich with an intensely vanilla cream in a crisp, not-too-sweet shell. Pastries taken to-go are packaged in reusable plastic pencil cases adorably slapped with a robot sticker. In yet another departure from his peers, Laurent Favre-Mot will be offering a limited savory lunch and brunch in the back room of the pâtisserie.

— Catherine Down, October 2015 

Continue reading Laurent Favre-Mot

Gravity Bar

Practical information

Address: 43 rue des Vinaigriers, 75010
Nearest transport: Jacques Bonsergent (5)
Hours: Closed Sunday & Monday
Reservations: Not Accepted
Telephone: 06 11 84 21 76
Average price for a cocktail:12€
Average price for dinner:10-19€
Style of cuisine: Small plates

Reviews of interest

Le Fooding (2015) “Le Gravity, bar à manger du frais, exerce déjà son pouvoir d’attraction : c’est plein à craquer, extérieur compris.”

52 Martinis (2015) “The selection is packed with ingredients that won’t be immediately recognizable to the average drinker: Gentiane Salers, Maurin Kina, Galliana Ristretto, etc. These kinds of non-mainstream ingredients (well known in the craft cocktail world, less so outside of it) can either elevate or crush a menu. And it takes a skilled professional to pull this off with aplomb. Fortunately, that’s exactly what they have with Michael Mas behind the bar.”

Time Out (2015) “Les assiettes à partager finissent de nous séduire. De la vraie cuisine, imaginative et goûteuse, pour l’apéritif. Bonbons de saumon à l’érable et cacahuète, tataki de canard figue et pistache… Nos papilles frétillent et notre carte bleue se porte bien : toutes les assiettes sont à moins de 10 €. On mange bien, on boit bien et c’est beau.”


Practical information

Address: 52 rue Faubourg Saint-Martin, 75010
Nearest transport: Jacques Bonsergent (5)
Hours: Open every day
Reservations: Walk-Ins Welcome
Telephone: 01 42 41 73 31
Average price for lunch: 10-19€
Style of cuisine: Soup, salad & sandwiches
Website   Facebook

Reviews of interest

Sprudge (2015) “While the coffee is carefully selected, here the focus is more all-around cafe as opposed to coffee bar; it’s the entirety of Blackburn that’s important, not just what they’re serving. There are fresh juices if you’re not in a coffee mood, all food and most of the pastries are made in house, and there’s even an inviting couch at the back – a vintage Scandinavian model of course.”

Good Coffee in Paris (2014) “… the awesomely understated Blackburn Café, content in its isolation and home to some excellent coffee… Coffee is à la demande (by request), with an interesting variation in the beans, which have origins as diverse as Indonesia, Ethiopia and Salvador. There are several seating options depending on how much conversation is desired, and  sections for reading and laptop work.

Photo via Blackburn’s Facebook page

Hakata Choten

While the focus of this cheap and cheerful Japanese franchise is ostensibly the authentic tonkatsu ramen, the real highlight is the gyoza with a thick, crisp, seared crust and a juicy pork filling. The parent restaurant won the Prix du Concours National of Gyoza in Japan in 2004, and the dumplings truly are winners. The dining room is busy and the lines can be long, but the steaming bowls of ramen come out fast and are worth the wait. The counter seating on the bottom floor makes this a nice option for dining alone.

— Catherine Down, September 2015

Continue reading Hakata Choten

Chez la Vieille

Chef Daniel Rose of Spring restaurant has purchased Chez La Vieille and plans to reopen this historic Les Halles institution in January 2016. Here’s an excerpt from our article about his plans:

“Chez la Vieille occupies an unassuming corner at the intersection of two quiet streets, Bailleul and l’Arbre Sec, between the Louvre and what’s left of Les Halles. It was opened by the formidable Adrienne Biasin back in 1960 and catered – like most restaurants in this neighborhood – to a clientele of workers from the nearby Les Halles market. When the towering iron and glass pavillions were torn down in 1968 and the market was transferred to the sanitary suburb of Rungis, the “old lady’s” place remained as a comfort for locals who were (and still are) mourning the loss of “the belly of Paris.”

Continue reading Chez la Vieille

Profiterole Chérie

This bright pink pastry shop  sells single serving profiteroles from Meilleur Ouvrier de France (MOF) pâtissier Philippe Urraca. The choux are baked every 40 minutes to keep them crisp. The snowball sized choux are assembled to order, and available in a dozen flavors ranging from classics like the standard vanilla ice cream  with hot chocolate sauce to the more unique, such as lemon pastry cream and meringue filling served with lemon curd sauce. Each choux is served in an ice cream cup with a plastic shot of sauce on the side, so you can eat them on the run or settle down in the salon. The choux were notably crunchy, but overall, the flavor combinations were uneven. The salted caramel was a favorite.

Continue reading Profiterole Chérie

La Fine Mousse Restaurant

It should come as no surprise that the Parisian craft beer pioneers behind La Fine Mousse bar would be the first to open a restaurant dedicated to beer and food pairings. Slightly more surprising is just how refined, inventive, and delicious the food here is. Knowledgeable beer sommeliers work closely with the talented chef to present an intelligent set of seasonal small plates, paired with beers from one of the 10 taps or the extensive bottle collection.

Continue reading La Fine Mousse Restaurant

Ob-La-Di Café

Ob-La-Di might be the most Instagrammed café of the 2015 rentrée, but there’s real substance at this stylish spot in the Haut Marais. Most of the baked goods are made in-house, and many of them manage to be vegan and gluten-free, and still actually taste good. Coffee is expertly prepared with Lomi beans by Lloyd, formerly of Boot Café, who also curates a killer playlist most days. Creative offerings include an affogato made with cookie dough ice cream, horchata, a vegetarian burger, and avocado toast that is worth an eye-popping €9 price tag due to the homemade purple potato bread and chimichurri sauce, plus pomegranate seeds.

— Catherine Down, September 2015

An Absolute Favorite

Continue reading Ob-La-Di Café

Le Triangle

In an exciting step forward for the craft beer scene in Paris, Le Triangle has opened its doors to become Paris’ first-ever gastrobrewpub. With brewing kettles on display behind the bar, an excellent selection of guest beers on tap (house-made brews are slated for early 2015), and enticing seasonal dishes coming out of the kitchen, the respect for good product is evident. The welcome is warm, the staff enthusiastic, the prices reasonable, and the menu changes daily – what more can a beer-loving foodie ask for?  Continue reading Le Triangle


Following their success with Verjus, where the more elaborate formula of dégustation + wine pairings has drawn a loyal following of happy locals and visiting celebrities, Braden Perkins and Laura Adrian have decided to open something more casual. Let’s call it “serious casual” because at Ellsworth (named for Perkins’ grandfather), foods that you might see at a county fair are elevated through careful sourcing and a sincere spirit of DIY. Corn dogs are thus filled with house-made rabbit sausage and paired with bitter mustard greens. Potato skins are topped with melted tomme and enlivened by crunchy chicken skin instead of crumbled bacon.

Continue reading Ellsworth

Our Favorite Three Star Restaurants in Paris

In discussing the three-star restaurant L’Ambroisie, which ranks among the most expensive in the world, people often bring up a quote by chef Bernard Pacaud. “Someone’s first meal here is never their best,” he once said. “It takes at least two or three meals for us to learn the customer and for the customer to learn us.”

This was true for food blogger Adam Goldberg, who wrote a scathing report of his first meal at L’Ambroisie. After returning more than twenty times, however, he declared “I am now certain that this is the finest French restaurant in the world.” Continue reading Our Favorite Three Star Restaurants in Paris