Ratapoil du Faubourg – NOW CLOSED

NOW CLOSED

Former Address: 72 rue du Faubourg Poissonnière, 75010

Reviews of interest

Figaroscope (2015) “Coup de chapeau pour le menu déjeuner à 22 € qui tape juste et suit le marché du jour: moules à la plancha épices au chorizo, épaule de porcelet confite, écrasée de pommes de terre et épinards, tarte fine aux pommes, crème fouettée à la cannelle. Pas d’esbroufe, goûts justes et fraîcheur des produits, on achète!”

Table à Découvert (2015) “Je me réchauffe aussitôt au pavé de lieu noir cuit à la vapeur (c’est bien aussi la cuisson vapeur, les chairs sont fermes et tendres, ça donne une belle humidité), ses grenailles et légumes d’hiver poêlés (navet jaune et autres légumes racines) et cette sauce terrible, olives noires, câpres et herbes, le tout haché dans une huile d’olive dont l’épaisseur me fait penser à un jus à peine pressé, encore un peu épais et très jeune. C’est sans doute la présence de tous les condiments qui émulsionne un peu l’huile et ça fait comme un retour en arrière, c’est délicieux.”

John Talbott (2014) “Deceptive, dreadful and dirty too boot… At the end of the meal we wondered, how could Figoroscope have misled us so by giving this restaurant 3 hearts!”

Le Figaro (2014) “Il y a là une heureuse construction de carte (à l’aise comme au tapas, inspiré comme au menu unique, ample comme au repas dégustation). Il y a surtout une cuisine rafraîchissante, appliquée dans ses sources (de vrais bons produits) et se creusant le ciboulot même si, ici ou là, avec quelques imprécisions, un peu essoufflée à tenir la distance.”

Photo via Ratapoil du Faubourg’s Facebook page

2 thoughts on “Ratapoil du Faubourg – NOW CLOSED”

  1. hmmm says:

    I visited Ratapoil for lunch last week and ordered the lunch menu entree/plat/dessert for 22 euros + glass of white South African wine at 4 euros. Unfortunately, I walked out not sure if I would ever go back. This place has so much potential, so it is strange to see it miss the mark in such basic, obvious ways. On the positive side, the owners have put care and attention into the decor and it is a pleasant, but not stuffy, atmosphere in which to have a relaxing lunch (no outdoor seating). They also offer a nice selection of fresh breads with your meal that goes beyond the traditional baguette. For my starter, I had the coques and seaweed salad, and that is where the problems began. The small coques (all five of them) had not been properly soaked to eliminate the sand, so they were rather gritty. As for the mix of seaweed, it didn’t seem as if anything had been done to elevate the flavors or transform them beyond their natural state. While most of the seaweed looked and smelled fresh (and I was happy to see it on the menu, as I believe in its health benefits), there were a couple of bites that seemed a bit gloppy and slimy – which could prove off-putting for a significant number of diners. For the main course, I ordered fish (cabillaud), which was served without the skin atop a mix of fresh vegetables. Here again, they missed the mark at making this a totally successful dish. The fish was served without any sort of seasoning or sauce to provide additional flavor, and the vegetables were not evenly cooked (some were crunchy, others were soft). That said, the fish and vegetables were very fresh, so I cannot fault the quality of the products. For dessert, I order the rice pudding with the dulce de leche caramel sauce. Once again, I found it curious to be presented with what looked to be cooked grains of rice served in a firm, unflavored whipped cream, rather than in its traditional fresh vanilla pudding. The dulce de leche was presented in thin circles around the dessert, rather than with a generous dollop (a generous abundance of dulce de leche might have explained the choice of a lighter whipped cream over a heavy pudding, but such was not the case). While I cannot say that it wasn’t good (who doesn’t like fresh whipped cream?), it wasn’t particularly satisfying. So this proved yet another headscratcher, as making a satisfying rice pudding is not normally a culinary feat of great difficulty. As for wine, I reviewed their ‘by the glass’ offerings and requested to taste the South African white wine. When I remain unconvinced and asked the waiter what else he would recommend, jesuggested no other wine that would go well with the meal, and recommended that I stay with the bottle he had in his hand. I followed his advice, but was not impressed with that particular selection. There was no ahhh moment of seeing a nice wine complement the flavor of the dishes and bring out something new and interesting. So there it is… With more attention to seasoning and detail, they could easily raise the freshness of their produce to a much, much higher level. But will they do it? Too bad if they don’t, because it could be a very pleasant place to have a nice meal.

  2. hmmm says:

    I visited Ratapoil for lunch last week and ordered the lunch menu entree/plat/dessert for 22 euros + glass of white South African wine at 4 euros. Unfortunately, I walked out not sure if I would ever go back. This place has so much potential, so it is strange to see it miss the mark in such basic, obvious ways. On the positive side, the owners have put care and attention into the decor and it is a pleasant, but not stuffy, atmosphere in which to have a relaxing lunch (no outdoor seating). They also offer a nice selection of fresh breads with your meal that goes beyond the traditional baguette. For my starter, I had the coques and seaweed salad, and that is where the problems began. The small coques (all five of them) had not been properly soaked to eliminate the sand, so they were rather gritty. As for the mix of seaweed, it didn’t seem as if anything had been done to elevate the flavors or transform them beyond their natural state. While most of the seaweed seem fresh (and I was happy to see it on the menu, as I believe in its health benefits), there were a couple of bites that seemed a bit gloopy, old and slimy – which could prove off-putting for a significant number of diners. As for the main course, I ordered fish (cabillaud), which was served without the skin atop a mix of fresh vegetables. Here again, they missed the mark at making this a totally successful dish. The fish was served without salt or any sort of seasoning or sauce to give it additional flavor, and the vegetables were not evenly cooked (some were crunchy, others were soft). That said, the fish and vegetables were very fresh, so I cannot fault the quality of the produce. As for dessert, I order the rice pudding with the dulce de leche caramel sauce. Once again, I found it curious when what I was served seemed to be cooked grains of rice served in a firm, unflavored whipped cream, rather than its traditional fresh vanilla pudding. The dulce de leche was presented in thin circles around the dessert, rather with a generous dollop. While I cannot say that it wasn’t good (who doesn’t like fresh whipped cream?), it wasn’t particularly satisfying. So this proved yet another headscratcher, as making a satisfying rice pudding is not normally a culinary feat of great difficulty. As for the wine, I had requested to taste the South African wine, but when I remain unconvinced, the waiter suggested no other wine that would go well with the meal, and recommended that I stay with the bottle he had in his hand. I followed his advice, but was not impressed with that particular selection. There was no ahhh moment of seeing a nice wine complement the flavor of the dishes and bring out something new and interesting. So there it is… With more attention to seasoning and detail, they could easily raise the freshness of their produce to a much, much higher level. But will they do it? Too bad if they don’t, because it could be a very pleasant place to have a nice meal.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *