Tag Archives: 75011

Photo by Meg Zimbeck

6036

Subtle, inexpensive Japanese bites from a former chef at Abri. Small plates in a small place with a nice list of natural wines. There are only 14 seats so be prepared to queue.

Practical information

Address: 82 rue Jean Pierre Timbaud, 75011
Nearest transport: Couronnes (2), Parmentier (3)
Hours: Closed Sunday and Monday; Open Tuesday-Thursday for dinner and Friday-Saturday for lunch and dinner
Reservations: Book a day or two in advance. The table d’hôte can also be reserved for a minimum of 10.
Telephone: 01 73 71 38 12
Average price for lunch: 10-19€
Average price for dinner: 20-39€
Style of cuisine: Japanese
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Reviews of interest

Not Drinking Poison in Paris (2014) “6036 bills itself as izakaya, or Japanese bar food, but this is a ruse: it’s actually a modest and sincere gastronomic experience, helmed by chef Haruka Casters, formerly sous-chef at 10ème arrondissement tasting-menu destination Abri.”

Astier

This classic, checkered tablecloth bistro is famous for its cheese tray.

Practical information

Address: 44 rue Jean-Pierre Timbaud
Nearest transport: Parmentier (3)
Hours: Open every day
Reservations: Book a day or two in advance
Telephone: 01 43 57 16 35
Average price for lunch: 20-34€
Average price for dinner: 20-34€
Style of cuisine: Classic French
Website

Reviews of interest

David Lebovitz (2011) “…we were thoroughly pleased with chunky block of house-made foie gras sprinkled with fleur de sel, with toasted brioche and chutney alongside. Warm brandade (whipped salted fish and potatoes) was a good rendition of the classic…”

Patricia Wells (2010) “A lovely, old-time bistro dinner in Paris last night at Astier, a longtime favorite… I opted for a starter of rabbit rillettes, moist, flavorful…The roasted codfish wrapped in ham and bathed in fresh white shell beans and a touch of tomato offered a lovely, light touch, and the dessert of poached quince hit the spot.”

Mark Bittman for The New York Times (2009) “The cheeses are splendid, but equally important is supporting the old tradition (before worries about sanitation overtook the world) at your table, where you can pick it to death until someone else asks for it…”

Le Figaro (2008) “Bistrot de tradition bien repris en mains…”

bistrot paul bert tarte tatin

Bistrot Paul Bert

The menu at this perennial favorite is seasonally-minded, and a carnivore’s paradise. Not for the faint of heart, or appetite.

An absolute favorite

Practical information

Address: 18 rue Paul Bert, 75011
Nearest transport: Faidherbe-Chaligny (8)
Hours: Closed Sunday and Monday
Reservations: Book a few days in advance
Telephone: 01 43 72 24 01
Average price for lunch: 20-34€
Average price for dinner: 35-49€
Style of cuisine: Classic French

Reviews of interest

Le Figaro (2011) “…rapport simple au produit et ce culte de la gourmandise. Même soin apporté à la terrine de campagne maison qu’aux envolées plus fines (pigeon rôti et petits légumes ; lotte au gingembre…) et aux incontournables, dont le mythique paris-brest.”

Bruno Verjus (2011) “Ici l’on tâte et gâte le gourmand. Alors dérive et file le temps au gré de nourritures terrestres. Les desserts, par leurs énormes tailles créent un rapport d’enfance – tendre prodigalité. Du bon, du très bon, du généreux, un véritable bis trop.”

Patricia Wells (2010) “Last night at one of my favorite little places –Le  Bistrot Paul Bert in the 11th — I adored the addition of thinly sliced raw green asparagus. I’ve always preferred to braise my asparagus, but the earthy flavors of these raw veggies changed my mind!… Worth the journey, for sure.”

David Lebovitz (2010) “…it’s hard to go wrong with anything here. You can order from the fixed price menu or split a Côte de Boeuf (steak for two, which they will not cook further than medium-rare), which includes house made frites.”

Meg Zimbeck via Girls’ Guide to Paris (2010) “For those who are sincere in their desire to taste classic bistro fare, there are few places better than Le Bistrot Paul Bert.”

Alexander Lobrano via David Lebovitz (2009) “This crowded and very popular place is one of my favorite bistros in Paris…”

Barbra Austin (2009) “This one is on many people’s list of favorites, including mine…”

François Simon “Un de mes adresses préférées. Gourmand, puissant avec une carte des vins à perdre la nacre de vos yeux…”

Dorie Greenspan (2008) “…one of my hands-down favorite bistros…”

Cooperative Latte Cisternino

The source for some of the best burrata in town, and other products direct from Italy.

Practical information

Address: 46 rue du Faubourg Poissonière, 75010
Nearest transport: Poissonière (7)
Hours: Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. and 4:30 p.m.- 8 p.m.; closed Saturday and Sunday
Telephone: 01 47 70 30 36

Additional Locations

Address: 108 rue Saint Maur, 75011
Nearest transport: Parmentier (3)
Hours: Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. and 4:30 p.m.- 8 p.m.; closed Saturday and Sunday
Telephone: 01 43 38 54 54

Address: 17 rue Geoffroy Saint Hilaire, 75005
Nearest transport: Censier Daubenton (7)
Hours: Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. and 4:30 p.m.- 8 p.m.; closed Saturday and Sunday

Address: 37 rue Godot de Mauroy, 75009
Nearest transport: Havre-Caumartin (3, 9)
Hours: Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. and 4:30 p.m.- 8 p.m.; closed Saturday and Sunday
Telephone: 06 74 91 66 58

 

Yard, Paris

Yard

The former construction yard turned bistro has been around Père Lachaise for years, but the arrival of chefs Shaun Kelly and Eleni Sapera, formerly of Au Passage and Bones, is a breath of fresh air. Expect a lengthy list of natural wines, modern product driven small plates, and a warm welcome from owner Jane Drotter.

Practical information

Address: 6 Rue de Mont-Louis, 75011
Nearest transport: Philippe Auguste (2)
Hours: Closed Saturday & Sunday; Open for lunch & dinner Tuesday-Friday; Lunch only on Monday
Reservations: No reservations accepted for lunch, Book a few days in advance for dinner
Telephone: 01 40 09 70 30
Average price for lunch: 10-19€
Average price for dinner: 20-39€
Style of cuisine: modern French
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Reviews of Interest

Caroline Mignot (2014) “Un air de taverne, des cuistots qui s’agitent derrière le passe-plat, je n’ai pas réussi à déterminer exactement quoi, mais il y a dans cette atmosphère quelque chose inconnu de Paris.”

Jerome Berger (2014) “Une cuisine de façade.”

Charles Patin O’Coohoon (2014) “Le chef australien Shaun Kelly réussit le mélange des genres français et Commonwealth dans l’assiette.”

John Talbott (2014) “Another great prix-qualité joint.”

Not Drinking Poison in Paris (2014) “Under its previous chef, Fabrice Mellado… Yard had a reputation as a pleasant brunch environment. Now, with Kelly and Sapera turning out a starkly sophisticated market menu and a generously priced natural wine list by Drotter, it’s poised to become something more.”

James Henry

James Henry to show his Bones

The rumors are true: James Henry, who made a name for himself at Au Passage, will be opening a new restaurant in early December.

Bones – the name was decided upon last night – will combine wine bar and restaurant in a single space at 43 rue Godefroy Caviagnac, enriching what is already a gastronomically blessed corner of the 11th (see also RinoSeptimeCheZ alineRetro’bottegaLa Pulperia and Bistrot Paul Bert).

The wine bar up front will be a no-reservations space featuring elevated snacks and small plates: oysters shucked before your eyes, fish carpaccio sliced to order, and mounds of charcuterie. Beyond a few window seats, Henry envisions this as a casual and standing-room only space.

The restaurant, on an elevated platform in the back, has room for around 25 seats. The precise menu format and pricing are still evolving, but a few things are clear: it will be affordable (35-45 euros), and it will be offal. Not exclusively offal, mind you, but Henry’s long fascination with the odd bits will be given free reign to flourish here at Bones. He wants the freedom to challenge himself and his diners with more adventurous fare – poached brain, horse heart, etc. – but will likely have options for timid eaters, too.

Another aspect which may set Bones apart from the pack is their desire to produce in-house as many ingredients as possible. Like he did at a previous restaurant in Tasmania, Henry plans to churn his own butter, produce his own vinegar, and bake bread from his own sourdough starter. He looks at the cellar and sees a space for curing meats. A cold-smoker is going into the courtyard.

The wine, unsurprisingly, will be on the “extreme” side of the natural wine spectrum. Henry cites Pierre Jancou and his list at Vivant Cave as inspiration, and hopes to bring in wines from beyond the hexagon.  The white marble covering the walls at Jancou’s bar will also be seen on the bar at Bones, along with polished concrete on the floors and vintage (cracked) white tiles on the walls.

Stay tuned for updates, and we’ll let you know closer to time when they announce an opening date.

 

Le Petit Cheval de Manège (CLOSED)

NOW CLOSED A ruby-red corner bistro, serving a well-priced market menu by chef/owner Xavier Thierry, a vet of Lapérouse and Lucas Carton.

Practical information

Address: 5 rue Froment, 75011 – NOW CLOSED


View a map of all of our restaurants here

Reviews of interest

  • Emmanuel Rubin – Figaroscope (2012) “une vraie pépite de quartier où…une cuisine d’ardoise, vive et volubile…”
  • Alexander Lobrano (2011) “Thierry’s food was well-sourced, original and assiduously well-cooked in terms of timing, texture and heat at the table…great for casual dining and a good place to see just how cosmopolitan contemporary French cooking has become…”
  • John Talbott (2011) “He’s got talent. Everybody in Paris these days, says they do a cuisine du marche, but this guy really walks the walk…”

About our listings
Our best efforts were made to insure that information provided was accurate at time of publication. Have a correction or update? Send it here.

Les Trois Seaux by Aaron Ayscough

Les Trois Seaux

A no-frills bistro with a great wine list.

Practical information

Address: 58 rue de la Fontaine au Roi, 75011
Nearest transport: Goncourt (11)
Hours: Open for dinner only Tuesday-Saturday; closed Sunday and Monday
Reservations: Last minute booking usually OK
Telephone: 09 54 27 86 86
[cetsEmbedGmap src=http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UTF8&msa=0&msid=202475318786031781734.0004a3c94adfc7bd98d6a&ll=48.868272,2.373819&spn=0.013861,0.038581&z=15 width=500 height=325 marginwidth=0 marginheight=0 frameborder=0 scrolling=no]View a map of all of our restaurants here.
Average price for lunch: 10-19€
Average price for dinner: 20-34€
Style of cuisine: Classic French
Special attributes: market-based cooking, comfort food, superior wine list
Type of crowd: hipsters, bobos, neighborhood locals
Interior: bare bones & minimal
Atmosphere: casual

Reviews of interest

  • John Talbott (2011) “Go?  For the wine, charcuterie and cheese, yes; but keep it simple!”
  • Aaron Ayscough (2011) “I can only hope everyone else in the neighborhood finds the basic ideas as charming as I do: natural wines, informal service…Les Trois Seaux will be serving more bistro-style fare…”
  • Le Fooding (2011) “Du coup, la carte des 3 Seaux (5 entrées et 5 plats) fait aussi cours de géo ! Les navets sont du Pardailhan, les carottes de sable du Languedoc et les champignons du Val d’Oise, quand l’agneau est du Limousin…”

About our listings
Our best efforts were made to ensure that information provided was accurate at time of publication. Have a correction or update? Send it here.

 

 

Rino by Meg Zimbeck

Rino (CLOSED)

Giovanni Passerini made a name for Rino with his modern market cooking and handmade pastas. He sold Rino in late 2013. NOW CLOSED

Practical information

Address: 46 rue Trousseau 75011 – NOW CLOSED

[cetsEmbedGmap src=http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UTF8&msa=0&msid=202475318786031781734.0004a3c90f83e2b8a9549&ll=48.852546,2.379141&spn=0.013865,0.038581&z=15 width=500 height=325 marginwidth=0 marginheight=0 frameborder=0 scrolling=no]View a map of all of our restaurants here.

Reviews of interest

  • François Simon (2010) “…une table agréable et valeureuse.”
  • Barbra Austin (2010) “a parade of very pretty plates… a fantastic escabeche of rouget with white asparagus…sardine ravioli in fennel consommé…a thick, trembling cut of cod with pil pil sauce..”
  • Meg Zimbeck (2010) “I was delighted…There’s something really fun about looking at a menu and having no idea about the taste of the proposed dishes.”
  • Alexander Lobrano (2010) “Simple, sincere, delicious, intense, this was one of the best meals I’ve eaten in a longtime…”
  • Phyllis Flick (2010) “…daring market-based cuisine is light without the use of heavy sauces, using the best of seasonal ingredients including stunning vegetables…”
  • John Talbott (2010) “Great fish, wonderful chef and waitstaff, otherwise OK.”
  • Emmanuel Rubin – Le Figaro (2010) “Une cuisine d’entre slam et ring, tout à la fois énergique, dans l’élan, dans l’influx, épatante à jongler entre le naturel et le juteux…”

About our listings
Our best efforts were made to ensure that information provided was accurate at time of publication. Have a correction or update? Send it here.