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Boucherie les Provinces

Address: 20 Rue d’Aligre, 75012
Hours: Open Wednesday–Sunday lunch, Wednesday–Saturday dinner
Telephone: +33 (0)1 43 43 91 64
Website / Facebook

Meat enthusiasts won’t be disappointed by this bustling butchershop-cum-restaurant set in the Marché d’Aligre, one of Paris’ most popular neighborhood markets. On the menu, you’ll find the usual French steak classics of entrecôte, faux-filet, and onglet, as well as a large selection of lamb, veal and pork. True carnivores (and the more adventurous) can opt for tartare maison, sweetbreads, or andouillette sausage.

Les Enfants du Marché

Les Enfants du Marché, a modern & creative restaurant located within the open-air Marché des Enfants Rouges market in the upper Marais, is a dining counter known for natural wine and avant-garde cuisine. While the seating on bar stools in the bustling market might suggest a more lowbrow offering, the surprising combinations on Japanese chef Masahide Ikuta's unforgettable plates evoke a far more fine dining affair (an evocation reflected in the highbrow prices). It is one of our favorite Paris restaurants.

Eels

We haven’t yet reviewed this restaurant, but you can scroll down to find the practical information and to read what others are saying about Eels.

Practical Information

Address: 27 Rue d’Hauteville, 75010
Hours: Open Tuesday-Saturday from 12:30-14:00 and from 19:30-22:00.
Telephone: +33 (0)1 42 28 80 20
Website    Online Booking    Facebook   Instagram

What people are saying

  • The Financial Times (2018) Nicholas Lander says that his lunch “delivered everything I look for in a meal anywhere: the kind of hospitality I would expect from someone in their own home combined with ultra-professional cooking of straight-forward ingredients.”
  • Le Monde (2018) François Simon calls this a serene spot, noting that chef Adrien Ferrand undoubtedly earned that characteristic alongside his mentor William Ledeuil from Ze Kitchen Galerie. He calls it a sort of comfort food, with plates that are brilliantly balanced and service that is friendly and efficient.
  • Le Fooding (2017) says that Eels “ticks off all the necessary boxes for a Parisian faubourgeois affaire: polished recipes, well-sourced ingredients, unadulterated wines and zero nonsense.” They rave about a dish of smoked eel with licorice-infused browned butter and the wines selected by Félix le Louarn.
  • Alexander Lobrano (2017) calls Eels the best new table of the rentrée “due to the superbly witty, inventive and assured cooking of chef Adrien Ferrand.” He praises the front-of-house staff for delivering “a flawless and charming service experience around the outstanding cooking of Adrien Ferrand.”
  • L’Express (2017) raves about the signature dish with “small sections of lightly smoked fish, hazelnut butter and hazelnut chips for the roundness, a touch of liquorice for spicy sweetness, shoots of oxalis and green apple for freshness.”
  • L’Entente

    Three cheers to L’Entente founder Oliver Woodhead for having arrived at such an apt name for his curiously dainty, all-day- service “British brasserie” near Opéra. An entente is a diplomatic understanding between nations; any understanding, of course, is what British and French cultures have notably failed to acquire of one another over the last thousand years.

    Dessance

    We’ve visited and will be adding our review soon. In the meantime, you can scroll to see our photos and what others have said about Dessance.

    Practical information

    Address: 74 rue des Archives, 75003
    Nearest transport: Filles du Calvaire (8), Rambuteau (11)
    Hours: Closed Monday & Tuesday; Open Wednesday-Sunday continuously for lunch & dinner
    Telephone: +33 1 42 77 23 62
    Website   Facebook    Instagram

    Dessance in pictures

    Photos by Meg Zimbeck © Paris by Mouth

    What people are saying about Dessance

    David Lebovitz (2015) “Like most experimental food, not everything is a hit. A starter of mustard leaf sorbet that was paired with mirabelle plums and smoked cheese (shown up above) tasted – well…like a frozen puree of mustard leaves. But a grated carrot sorbet with pea puree and pea shoots was excellent. And I loved the ripe strawberries with parsley ice cream and fruit leather that led the way to the final course.”

    The Financial Times (2014) “On a recent visit, the four-course degustation menu began on a savory note – raw tuna paired with tangy orbs of red and white currants, droplets of peach purée, avocado sorbet, and a red onion emulsion that was so good I’d like to suggest they sell it as a condiment.”

    Sugared & Spiced (2014) “This second visit to Dessance was overall a pleasant experience. Some dishes were a bit too much for me in terms of flavor combination, but Dessance still remains an interesting address to visit for its unusual creations. For a change of the Paris sweet scene, why not?”

    The New York Times (2014) “The menu at Dessance doesn’t run toward the pastries, cakes and tarts that a desserts-only concept might imply, but rather offers a small but intriguing collection of dishes that can be eaten as both desserts and main courses, including, for example, a surprising combination of violet-colored vitelotte potato purée with raw and poached apples, arugula and marjoram granité.”

    Le Figaro (2014) “Plutôt convaincante à prouver, par un jeu de compositions biseautées, que l’idée du repas en mode sucré ne se réduit pas au final d’un repas.”

    Table à Découvert (2014) “Le menu ne se substitue pas à un repas (à moins qu’il y ait des adeptes), mais se déguste comme un moment à part, après un plat salé dégusté ailleurs (même s’il y a 2,3 propositions de salées comme des madeleines au roquefort, une assiette de comté, coing et scones ou un foie gras mi-cuit, butternut, fruit de la passion, brioche).”

    Arnaud Nicolas

    At the impossibly young age of 24, Arnaud Nicolas achieved one of the highest honors in gastronomy – the title Meilleur Ouvrier de France (MOF) – for his talent in charcuterie. Fourteen years later, he opened an ambitious shop and restaurant near the Eiffel Tower with the explicit goal of returning charcuterie to a place of honor on the French table. In the same way that prize-winning artisans have reshaped traditional baguette-making and pâtisserie, Nicolas wants to reintroduce charcuterie to palates that have become used to mediocre industrialized examples. So is it really that different? Yes.

    Le Baratin

    Food and wine pilgrims, particularly those who read the New York Times or watch Anthony Bourdain, are willing to climb the hill for this Belleville institution. Raquel Carena tends the fire, offering her own personal brand of bistro cooking - sometimes delicate, sometimes hearty, always heartfelt. In stark contrast to the loving kitchen, the dining room is cold as ice, thanks to the joyless leadership of Carena's husband Philippe.

    Le Chateaubriand

    Le Chateaubriand currently holds the #4 ranking in our list of our favorite Tasting Menus under 100€You can only reserve for the first seating at Le Chateaubriand. After that, you’ll have to wait in line from 9pm for a stab at Iñaki Aizpitarte’s no-choice tasting menu, a parade of provocative flavor pairings that has landed the restaurant on San Pellegrino’s 50 Best list for several years running. Whether you love or hate this restaurant may depend on your affinity for natural wine and improvisational cooking. We have had brilliant meals here, where every delicious dish taught us something new. We have been outraged, and we have been indifferent. You never quite know what to expect here, and that’s part of the fun. Just be sure to go with omnivorous friends who share that outlook.

    L’Assiette

    With its worn wooden tables, intricately painted ceilings, and charcuterie slicer propped on the marble counter, L'Assiette has the precise look of a dream Paris bistro. It also serves many of the classic dishes, like escargots and cassoulet, which have mostly disappeared from the city's restaurants. The far-flung location in the 14th arrondissement, near the Catacombs but far from the center, has probably helped L'Assiette to stay off the tourist radar. Chef David Rathgeber and his team are friendly with visitors but don't cater to them. The customers who come to indulge in this hearty fare are mostly local, which makes this a great option for tourists looking to avoid their own countrymen.

    L’Éclair de Génie Café

    Practical information

    Address: 31 rue Lepic, 75018
    Nearest transport: Abbesses (12),  Blanche (2)
    Hours: Open every day from 8:30am
    Reservations: Reservations not accepted
    Telephone: 01 84 79 23 40
    Average price for lunch: Less than 10€
    Style of cuisine: Baked goods, soups/salads/sandwiches
    Website   Facebook

    Photo via L’Éclair de Génie Café’s Facebook

    Sauvage

    Address: 60, rue du Cherche Midi, 75006
    Hours: Open Monday-Saturday for lunch & dinner. Closed Sunday.
    Telephone: +33 1 45 48 86 79
    Facebook / Instagram

    In Other Words

    Time Out (2016) “As soon as you enter this well-presented cave-cum-restaurant on the Rue du Cherche-Midi, you get an inkling you’re going to eat well. There’s something about all those interesting wine bottles stacked on the walls, the friendly intimacy of the main room (just 15 tables) and the small kitchen nestled at the back that immediately gives a good, homey impression.”

    Astrance

    Address: 4, rue Beethoven, 75016
    Hours: Open Tuesday-Friday for lunch & dinner. Closed Saturday, Sunday & Monday.
    Telephone: +33 1 40 50 84 40
    Online Booking / Website / Facebook / Instagram

    COVID-19 UPDATE:
    Astrance is currently closed until further notice.

    Astrance in Photos

    In Other Words

    As of early 2020, work has begun on a new l’Astrance at the former location of le Jamin, set to open summer 2020.

    Condé Nast Traveler (2015) “It’s a sanctuary where you can revel in the pleasures of such dishes as spinach with spicy piquillo peppers, chili pepper sorbet, and baby ravioli stuffed with a tangy bite of citron.”

    Le Grand Restaurant

    Address: 7 rue d’Aguesseau, 75008
    Hours: Open Monday-Friday for lunch & dinner. Closed Saturday & Sunday.
    Telephone: +33 1 53 05 00 00
    Book Online / Website / Instagram

    COVID-19 UPDATE:
    Le Grand Restaurant is currently closed.

    Le Grand Restaurant in Photos

    In Other Words

    Le Figaro (2015) “Le plat à ne pas laisser filer: homard bleu de Bretagne en feuille de figuier, mûres épicées, foie gras au poivre sauvage, pur instant de mijoté réinventé.”

    Simon Says (2015) “En fait, si l’on a bien compris, Jean François Piège semble vouloir siffler la fin d’une mi temps où les chefs faisaient un peu n’importe quoi (voir ailleurs s’ils y étaient). Il est en cuisine avec ses coéquipiers (chacun à sa place), fait une cuisine franche, lisible et distincte. C’est du premier degré (ouf!). Avec un élément nouveau: la sincérité. “

    The Beast

    Frenchman Thomas Abramowicz spent a year training in central Texas and tracking down everything he would need (meat, wood, Bourbon) to open the first authentic smokehouse in Paris. Beef is king here, in the form of slow and low smoked brisket and gigantic ribs, but barbecued chicken, baby back ribs and pulled pork also feature on the short menu. Vinegary cole slaw and steamed vegetables instead of baked beans or mac & cheese, but you can still expect to finish with pecan pie. Or just have another Bourbon – there are more than 50 to choose from – including impossible to find Pappy Van Winkle’s and a 22-year Elijah Craig – plus a handful of craft beers and natural red wines. Read the backstory here.

    Office

    Practical information

    Address: 3 rue Richer, 75009
    Nearest transport: Cadet (7), Grands Boulevards (8, 9)
    Hours: Closed Saturday and Sunday; Open Monday-Friday for lunch and dinner
    Reservations: Book a few days in advance
    Telephone: 01 47 70 67 31
    Website   Facebook   Book Online

    L’Office in photos

    What people are saying

    Have you been? Leave your own opinion about L’Office in the comments!

    John Talbott (2014) “The newest chef, Konrad Ceglowski, is a master of protein with fruit and veggies… seduced, successfully, by the sauteed calamari with a creamy fennel sauce, zucchini and squid ink.  It was superb, no other word for it.”

    Figaroscope (2011) “De jolies surprises dans des formules à prix doux : velouté de coco et lardo di Colonnata pour l’onctuosité, mariage détonnant de poulpe, os à moelle et citron, poulet tendre parfaitement rôti, girolles et panais. Une belle maîtrise qui s’affiche jusqu’au dessert…”

    Alexander Lobrano (2011) “I was impressed by [former chef] O’Donnell’s technically impeccable and very personal Italian accented bistro cooking…This is a terrific little restaurant, though—and also an excellent buy for the money.”

    John Talbott (2011) “…superbly priced lunch menus…the pork belly with tomato, egg and rocket and…the pulpo with bone marrow and lemon…were tasty, very tasty.”

    Table à Décourvert (2011) “un style entre les irrésistibles tables du moment (Septime, Frenchie, Autour d’un Verre) et le bon vieil Office que l’on aimait…Allez-y!”

     

     

     

     

     

    Yam’Tcha

    Universally praised Franco-Chinois fare from Adeline Grattard, and all but impossible to book. The restaurant moved to a new location at 121, rue Saint Honoré, 75001 in June 2015 and converted their old space at 4, rue Sauval into a tea salon and to-go window selling delicious steamed buns (bao). 

    Address: 121, rue Saint Honoré, 75001
    Hours: Open Wednesday-Saturday for lunch & dinner. Closed Sunday, Monday & Tuesday.
    Telephone: +33 1 40 26 08 07
    Website / Instagram

    COVID-19 UPDATE:
    Following the easing of lockdown, Yam’Tcha is currently offering meals to take away or to eat in at Lai’Tcha (7, rue du Jour), its second restaurant open Thursday-Saturday noon-6pm (until 10pm for takeaway) and Sunday noon-8pm. It is also offering a menu called Dîners d’Adeline Thursday-Saturday at 7:30pm or 9pm. Reserve online or via email (reservation@yamtcha.com). It has a few tables outside.

    Verjus Restaurant

    Address: 52 rue de Richelieu, 75001
    Hours: Open Monday-Friday for dinner only. Closed Saturday & Sunday.
    Telephone: +33 1 42 97 54 40
    Website / Book Online / FacebookInstagram

    COVID-19 UPDATE:
    Verjus is currently closed.

    Our Most Recent Visit

    I never tire of returning to Verjus, which has one of the most creative and affordable modern tasting menus in town. Chef Braden Perkins is self-taught, disciplined and obsessive. He makes time time for travel in order to take inspiration from chefs around the world, returning home to refine and personalize their best ideas. When he wasn’t happy with the produce available from local sources, he partnered with other chefs to cultivate a more direct network from farms in Normandy. The result of all this is a tasting menu that mixes a modest amount of meat or fish with some of the best vegetable creations I’ve ever tasted. Six very small dishes (snacks) are followed by homemade bread and butter, three more substantial dishes, and dessert for 78€. Perkins’ partner Laura Adrian has put together an incredible wine list that is heavy with organic and biodynamic producers, and her wine pairings for the tasting menu (55€) are spot on. On a practical note, there’s a private room that can be booked for 8-12 people, and the kitchen is known to accommodate a wide range of dietary issues with advance notice.

    Pirouette

    At this beautiful restaurant in the underserved district just north of Les Halles, serious technique is brought to bear on beautiful veggies and offal alike. The consistently delicious dishes, the polished room and the very good wine list all add up to something that’s much greater than the bargain prices should allow. There’s a prix fixe at lunch for only 15€, and diners can go à la carte at lunch or dinner for 36€. Chef Tomy Gousset departed in 2016 to open Tomy & Co, but Pirouette remains a solid bet.

    Ellsworth

    Address: 34 rue de Richelieu, 75001
    Hours: Open Tuesday-Saturday for lunch & dinner. Closed Sunday & Monday.
    Telephone: +33 1 42 60 59 66
    Website / Book Online / Facebook / Instagram

    2021 Update:
    Ellsworth is currently closed and not accepting reservations. They’re planning to reopen in September.

    Our Most Recent Visit

    Following their success with Verjus, where the more elaborate formula of dégustation + wine pairings has drawn a loyal following of happy locals and visiting celebrities, Braden Perkins and Laura Adrian have decided to open something more casual. Let’s call it “serious casual” because at Ellsworth (named for Perkins’ grandfather), foods that you might see at a county fair are elevated through careful sourcing and a sincere spirit of DIY. The fried chicken from Verjus Bar à Vins has moved over to Ellsworth, leaving the former as more of a place for drinks and snacks before or after dinner at Verjus

    David Toutain

    David Toutain, who brought acclaim to Agapé Substance before jumping ship back in December 2012, returned to the Paris scene with this signature restaurant in 2013. His meticulous and conceptual cooking highlights seasonal produce, with vegetables often playing the starring role. This is by no means a vegetarian restaurant, but Toutain's ability to bring out the beauty in oft-ignored roots reminds us of his former boss Alain Passard.

    Fish (La Boissonnerie)

    This popular restaurant and wine bar run by Drew Harre and Juan Sanchez is a sort of Anglo haven, excellent for a quick glass, a solo dinner at the bar, or for those times when you’re just tired of speaking French. The wine list is populated by small producers, many of them organic and bio-dynamic, with fair prices and plenty of options by the glass. They’re open every day, and we often find ourselves here on a Sunday or Monday when so many other restaurants are closed. Compared to their sister restaurant Semilla, the more gastronomic option across the street, Fish is the reliable bistro and a genuine Saint-Germain institution.

    52 Faubourg Saint Denis

    After L’Office and Le Richer (one of our favorite new openings of 2013), Charles Compagnon is back with another gift for the Faubourg. If he has run out of ideas for restaurant names, the same cannot be said for the dishes coming out of his kitchen. The compact menu with 3-4 choices per course contains plenty that we want to eat: well-roasted duck with coco beans, corn and kale, and an egg yolk ravioli with ham and mushrooms that was satisfyingly reminiscent of one of our favorite dishes at L’Office. Beyond the very good wine list, special attention has been paid to other liquids, starting with their own café Compagnon (roasted by Coutume), including a beer called La Maryse created in collaboration with Dirk Naudrs from De Proef, and finishing with a selection of very special small batch eaux de vie from Christoph Keller at the Stählemühle distillery. Like at Le Richer, this place is open every day with continuous service from 8am to midnight. No reservations, but you can wait (or eat, or drink) at the bar. 

    Frenchie

    Address: 5 Rue du Nil, 75002
    Hours: Open Monday-Friday for dinner. Open Thursday & Friday for lunch.
    Telephone: +33 1 40 39 96 19
    Book Online / Website / Facebook / Instagram

    COVID-19 UPDATE:
    During lockdown, Frenchie launched Frenchie to Go, a takeaway delivery service that it maintains following lockdown easing Tuesday-Saturday. Order the three- or four-course menus (complete with vegetarian options) online. Frenchie is also now open to dine-in; reserve online. It boasts a few tables on the pedestrianized rue du Nil available on a first-come, first-served basis.

    Verjus Bar à Vins

    This tiny space near the Palais Royal functions functions both as a neighborhood wine bar and as a holding tank for those waiting for their table at the restaurant upstairs. The printed wine list is filled with so many interesting bottles, and the ever-changing chalkboard list has plenty of options by the glass. The food options have changed several times over the years. Their famous fried chicken is no longer available here, having moved over to Ellsworth, but you can still order small plates to nibble with your wine. Options on the menu right now include veal tartare, house-made pork and duck terrine with pistachios, and warm Mont d’Or cheese with pickled mushrooms. Groups of more than two will have a hard time squeezing in, but the intimate space is perfect for an apéro before dinner upstairs or elsewhere in the neighborhood.

    Mokonuts

    Address: 5, rue saint Bernard, 75011
    Hours: Open Monday-Friday 8:45am-6pm. Closed Saturday & Sunday.
    Telephone: +33 9 80 81 82 85
    Website / Facebook / Instagram

    Our Review

    We have not yet reviewed this restaurant. Below you’ll find a summary of reviews to see what others are saying about it.

    In Other Words

    The New York Times (2019) is overwhelmed by Mokonuts’ daring decision to shutter for dinner, noting that the “the succinct, hyper-seasonal menu at Mokonuts, with its thoughtful natural wine list, reads like it’s for a fancy dinner. But the cafe is open only for breakfast and lunch.”

    Muscovado

    We first discovered Quina Lon during her pastry chef days at Au Passage and then Martin. Her pastries, never too sweet and always utilizing the freshest ingredients, were evidence of time spent in some of the best kitchens in the world (Dinner by Heston Blumenthal, Mugaritz). She partnered with her sister Francine, who holds an equally impressive CV (Eleven Madison Park, Dinner by Heston Blumenthal) to open Muscovado in 2016. The breakfast and lunch menus, which change often, are served Wednesday through Friday. Saturday and Sunday feature a special brunch menu from 10am – 5pm including classic egg dishes, coffee from Belleville Brûlerie, and of course their in house pastries that are available all day, everyday. They’re experimenting with also serving dinner on Thursday and Friday nights, but you may want to confirm that by calling for a reservation.