Category Archives: Restaurants

Cheval d’Or

Disregard what is written on the window of Cheval d’Or’s elegantly-preserved red façade, for what restaurateur Florent Ciccoli (of Jones and Café du Coin, among other endeavors) and chef Taku Sekine (of Dersou) have created on a quiet side street near the Parc des Buttes Chaumont is not a Chinese restaurant. Cheval d’Or is, rather, a tasteful and welcoming luxury small-plates restaurant offering a delicate synthesis of pan-Asian and Parisian cuisines, more middle-ground than Middle Kingdom. 

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Breizh Café Odéon

Langoustines and mayonnaise at Breizh Café Odéon

This slightly posher St-Germain sister restaurant of the long-time Marais favorite is turning out the same buttery buckwheat galettes as the original, but in less cramped conditions. Tables on the terrasse make this a great options for warm summer evenings, especially if you start with an icy platter of fresh oysters or langoustines.

Practical Information

Address: 1 Rue de l’Odéon, 75006
Hours: Open every day from 10am-11pm
Telephone: +33 1 42 49 34 73
Website    Online Booking    Facebook   Instagram

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Le Cadoret

Nestled on a drab Belleville backstreet beneath the Parc des Buttes Chaumont, Le Cadoret’s blue awning shines out like a beacon. So does chef Léa Fleuriot’s delicate, thoughtful approach to country-bistrot classics. A sleeper hit since Fleuriot and her brother Louis opened it in 2017, Le Cadoret is a bistrot and café where an ostensibly straightforward offering - traditional recipes, inexpensive natural wines, craft beers - achieves the sublime thanks to rare combination of sincere and efficient service, serious value, and an ironclad commitment to ingredient quality.

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Le Saint-Sébastien

This sweet little restaurant, which opened on a quiet street of the same name in late 2018, is a sparkling addition to the already glutted east Paris gastronomic scene. It has everything I want in a neighborhood joint – a warm welcome, reasonable prices and, for the moment, relative ease of snagging a reservation. The latter is likely to change, as more and more people catch on to the fact that beneath the casual appearance, this is actually a very serious restaurant. >> Read More

La Poule au Pot

La Poule au Pot is a looker. It's wonderful to walk in and witness the vintage wallpaper, the globe lighting, and the silver-plated serving chariot wheeling between Pepto-Bismol colored tables. It is at once a little elegant and also a touch cheesy. One can almost picture the 80s pop stars who used to slouch into these red banquettes, the mirrored pillars reflecting their manliner and sprayed hair. Today's Poule au Pot, having been recently rebooted by star chef Jean-François Piège, reflects something different - a desire for traditional cuisine bourgeouise and also the willingness (by some) to pay for it.

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Fulgurances L’Adresse

French food magazine Fulgurances opened L’Adresse in 2015 as a culinary incubator featuring a rotating cast of guest chefs. In 2016, we were blown away by the food of Israeli chef Tamir Nahmias. More recently, we returned for Mariana Villegas, a young Mexican chef who previously passed through Cosme and Union Square Café in New York. Her cooking is bright and inventive. Here's an update on what's happening at Fulgurances.

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La Buvette

La Buvette, opened in 2013, is perhaps the most stylish and intimate wine bar of its generation in Paris. Its Lilliputian confines are the size of the average e-cigarette shop, and yet manage to contain four small tables, a thin zinc bar, a prep kitchen, and in the rear, an authoritative-looking wine fridge. Scrawled on a wall-mounted mirror is the menu: a rotating array of highbrow nibbles, ranging from orange-zested white broad beans in olive oil to thick-cut nubs of andouille au lard, or intestine sausage laced with lardo.  >> Read More

Les Enfants du Marché

A key charm of the Marché des Enfants Rouges has long been the discrepancy between the surrounding Marais’ chic tourism and the humid food-hall atmosphere of the market itself. Les Enfants du Marché – a frankly luxuriant, avant-garde dining counter tucked in the rear right of the market – is arguably the first establishment to bridge these two cultures. >> Read More

Dining room at Robert restaurant in Paris | parisbymouth.com

Robert

I waited a long time before giving Robert a try. This restaurant from the team behind Martin (Loïc Martin & Edouard Bergeon) opened in February 2018, but early word-of-mouth reviews were very mixed. A common refrain was “it’s expensive for what it is.” >> Read More

Café du Coin

Fresh off Paris’ greatest resto reboot of recent years - transforming the defunct destination Restaurant Bones into the beloved seven-day mainstay Restaurant Jones - chef-restaurateur Florent Ciccoli doubled down on the Voltaire neighborhood in late 2017, opening Café du Coin with the aid of frequent collaborator Greg Back (L’Orillon, Les Pères Populaires).

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Café de la Nouvelle Mairie

For the wine-indifferent, Café de la Nouvelle Mairie is merely a timeless, picturesque terraced café on a shady lane beside the Panthéon. Wines are inexpensive and available by the carafe, like in the old days. The café’s simply-executed bistrot cuisine is well-sourced and agreeable: oeufs mayonnaise, chicken liver terrines studded with grapes, and hearty Angus steaks for pressure-free meals on long summer evenings.

But for alert wine geeks, Café de la Nouvelle Mairie might as well be the Panthéon itself, as pertains to natural wine.  >> Read More

Le 6 Paul Bert

Le 6 Paul Bert had a brief closure followed by several different chefs and menu makeovers. We’re not sure what’s going on over there right now, but will update this description after another visit. Here’s what we wrote about the first incarnation: >> Read More

Breizh Café

Breizh Café is by far our favorite crêperie in Paris Traditionalists like me, who always order a complète (ham, cheese, egg), appreciate the higher quality organic ingredients and the crispy lacy edges of their buckwheat galettes. More adventurous hunters can look to the daily and seasonal specials to top their galettes with upgrades like sea scallops and smoked duck breast. Dessert crêpes offer a few Japanese touches like ginger and yuzu alongside classic constructions with apples and ice cream. You can begin with ultra-fresh oysters or langoustines, sip artisanal ciders throughout the meal, and still escape for less than 20 per person. There are now three locations in Paris, which takes some heat off the original Marais location, but you should still book in advance. They’ve added online reservations to make that easy, and are now open every day at each location.

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Aux Deux Amis in Paris | parisbymouth.com

Aux Deux Amis

There’s a boisterous, fun vibe at this Oberkampf dive, where you’ll find a compelling selection of natural wine, outstanding charcuterie, and a short list of small plates that varies in quality depending on who’ve they’ve got working in the kitchen (it changes a lot). Expect loud music and great people watching. Don’t expect to snag a table. A great place to begin or end an evening, belly pressed against the bar, sharing snacks and bottles. Note: they used to do a great lunch service, but as of August 2018 they’re only open at night, serving cold tapas from 4:30pm until the kitchen opens from 7:30-11pm. >> Read More

Martin

Former Au Passage bartender Löic Martin opened his eponymous bar-restaurant in late 2014 in the shell of a former PMU betting parlor, placing his money on sincere small-plates, a populist booze program, and a boldly central location. Over the course of a few years and a few conceptual tweaks, Martin the bar-restaurant has blossomed into a booming shabby-chic nightspot, the social anchor of the haute-Marais, one of the few wide terraces in Paris offering truly excellent cuisine at accessible prices.  >> Read More

Aux Vins des Pyrénées

We’ve tested it and will be publishing a full review very soon. In the meantime, scroll down to see our photos and what others are saying about Vins des Pyrénées.

Practical Information

Address: 25 Rue Beautreillis, 75004
Hours: Open every day from 7:00-2:00
Telephone: +33 1 42 72 64 94
Website   Online Booking   Facebook   Instagram

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Vins des Pyrénées in pictures

Photos by Meg Zimbeck © Rome by Mouth

What people are saying

Reviews of the restaurant under the current management

  • François Simon (2018) approves of the tartare with anchovies and smoked egg and the bread pudding with salted butter caramel and whipped cream.
  • Le Figaro (2017) Emmanuel Rubin gives it 2 hearts (out of 5) and says
  • Alexander Lobrano (2017) says “who doesn’t love an address where you could actually become a regular without having to spend a small fortune or reserve in advance?” but closes with what might be read as faint praise: “Vins des Pyrénées isn’t a place you come in search of gastronomic exaltation, but it’s very likeable for so usefully offering a good feed and great drinks seven days a week in one of the most appealing neighbourhoods in Paris.”
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    Le Rigmarole

    Le Rigmarole opened in October 2017 and delighted me more than any other restaurant that year. A recent return visit confirmed my feeling that Le Rigmarole is honest, inexpensive and delicious. It's casual and a bit chaotic, and it deserves to be packed every night.

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    Eels

    We haven’t yet reviewed this restaurant, but you can scroll down to find the practical information and to read what others are saying about Eels.

    Practical Information

    Address: 27 Rue d’Hauteville, 75010
    Hours: Open Tuesday-Saturday from 12:30-14:00 and from 19:30-22:00.
    Telephone: +33 (0)1 42 28 80 20
    Website    Online Booking    Facebook   Instagram

    What people are saying

  • The Financial Times (2018) Nicholas Lander says that his lunch “delivered everything I look for in a meal anywhere: the kind of hospitality I would expect from someone in their own home combined with ultra-professional cooking of straight-forward ingredients.”
  • Le Monde (2018) François Simon calls this a serene spot, noting that chef Adrien Ferrand undoubtedly earned that characteristic alongside his mentor William Ledeuil from Ze Kitchen Galerie. He calls it a sort of comfort food, with plates that are brilliantly balanced and service that is friendly and efficient.
  • Le Fooding (2017) says that Eels “ticks off all the necessary boxes for a Parisian faubourgeois affaire: polished recipes, well-sourced ingredients, unadulterated wines and zero nonsense.” They rave about a dish of smoked eel with licorice-infused browned butter and the wines selected by Félix le Louarn.
  • Alexander Lobrano (2017) calls Eels the best new table of the rentrée “due to the superbly witty, inventive and assured cooking of chef Adrien Ferrand.” He praises the front-of-house staff for delivering “a flawless and charming service experience around the outstanding cooking of Adrien Ferrand.”
  • L’Express (2017) raves about the signature dish with “small sections of lightly smoked fish, hazelnut butter and hazelnut chips for the roundness, a touch of liquorice for spicy sweetness, shoots of oxalis and green apple for freshness.”
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    La Bourse et la Vie restaurant in Paris | parisbymouth.com

    La Bourse et La Vie

    La Bourse et la Vie is one of our favorite Classic Bistros in Paris. It’s a place where you come to celebrate, to bring a date, and to devour one of the best steak-frites in Paris.

    This dining room near the Bourse (the former stock exchange) is compact and cozy, complete with all the markers of a comforting old bistro. It’s largely filled with Americans, especially now that chef Daniel Rose has become the toast of Manhattan with his French restaurant Le Coucou. The latter is delicious but difficult to book and easily five times the price of La Bourse et la Vie. Rose’s primary restaurant in Paris (now that Spring has closed) feels like a steal if your reference point is French food in New York.

    When comparing it to other Paris bistros, this place feels lavish and expensive. On the surface, La Bourse et la Vie appears to have much in common with a neighborhood bistro serving classic dishes like poireaux vinaigrette, steak-frites and pot au feu. But look more closely and you’ll learn that the leeks are dotted with hazelnuts from Piemonte and the steak is 30-day aged Simmental beef.

    Steak frites, made with 30 day aged Simmental beef

    Rose, who is obsessed with old recipes, continues to resurrect and refine vintage dishes that modern-day travelers are rarely able to encounter. His version of pot au feu is deeply delicious and evokes the classic dish that was bubbling a century ago on stoves all over the nearby market neighborhood of Les Halles. However, it’s radically different and probably more delicious than the original because it marries perfectly cooked (not boiled to death) cuts of veal and lightly cooked vegetables with the sort of profound bouillon (broth) that has become Rose’s signature. It’s also served with a side dish of tête de veau with a sauce ravigotée. More “authentic” Paris bistros are not making food like this anymore.

    La Bourse et la Vie restaurant in Paris | parisbymouth.com

    Pot au Feu

    All of this specialness doesn’t come cheap, of course. That delicious steak-frites is priced at 39€, and dinner for two is likely to be 120€ before wine. However, most new restaurants that have opened in the years since Rose took over La Bourse et la Vie are offering much less for a similar price. Paris is becoming very expensive. At La Bourse et la Vie, it’s both expensive and very good.

    Practical information

    Address: 12 rue Vivienne, 75002
    Hours: Open Monday-Friday for lunch and dinner. Closed Saturday & Sunday.
    Telephone: +33 1 42 60 08 83
    Website   Facebook   Instagram   Book Online

    La Bourse et la Vie in pictures

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    L'Entente restaurant in Paris | parisbymouth.com

    L’Entente

    Three cheers to L’Entente founder Oliver Woodhead for having arrived at such an apt name for his curiously dainty, all-day- service “British brasserie” near Opéra. An entente is a diplomatic understanding between nations; any understanding, of course, is what British and French cultures have notably failed to acquire of one another over the last thousand years. >> Read More

    A la Renaissance Restaurant in Paris | Paris By Mouth

    À La Renaissance

    Great natural wines by the glass, fresh well-prepared food, and congenial service at this simple bistro near Bastille.

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    Dessance restaurant in Paris | parisbymouth.com

    Dessance

    We’ve visited and will be adding our review soon. In the meantime, you can scroll to see our photos and what others have said about Dessance.

    Practical information

    Address: 74 rue des Archives, 75003
    Nearest transport: Filles du Calvaire (8), Rambuteau (11)
    Hours: Closed Monday & Tuesday; Open Wednesday-Sunday continuously for lunch & dinner
    Telephone: +33 1 42 77 23 62
    Website   Facebook    Instagram

    Dessance in pictures

    Photos by Meg Zimbeck © Paris by Mouth

    What people are saying about Dessance

    David Lebovitz (2015) “Like most experimental food, not everything is a hit. A starter of mustard leaf sorbet that was paired with mirabelle plums and smoked cheese (shown up above) tasted – well…like a frozen puree of mustard leaves. But a grated carrot sorbet with pea puree and pea shoots was excellent. And I loved the ripe strawberries with parsley ice cream and fruit leather that led the way to the final course.”

    The Financial Times (2014) “On a recent visit, the four-course degustation menu began on a savory note – raw tuna paired with tangy orbs of red and white currants, droplets of peach purée, avocado sorbet, and a red onion emulsion that was so good I’d like to suggest they sell it as a condiment.”

    Sugared & Spiced (2014) “This second visit to Dessance was overall a pleasant experience. Some dishes were a bit too much for me in terms of flavor combination, but Dessance still remains an interesting address to visit for its unusual creations. For a change of the Paris sweet scene, why not?”

    The New York Times (2014) “The menu at Dessance doesn’t run toward the pastries, cakes and tarts that a desserts-only concept might imply, but rather offers a small but intriguing collection of dishes that can be eaten as both desserts and main courses, including, for example, a surprising combination of violet-colored vitelotte potato purée with raw and poached apples, arugula and marjoram granité.”

    Le Figaro (2014) “Plutôt convaincante à prouver, par un jeu de compositions biseautées, que l’idée du repas en mode sucré ne se réduit pas au final d’un repas.”

    Table à Découvert (2014) “Le menu ne se substitue pas à un repas (à moins qu’il y ait des adeptes), mais se déguste comme un moment à part, après un plat salé dégusté ailleurs (même s’il y a 2,3 propositions de salées comme des madeleines au roquefort, une assiette de comté, coing et scones ou un foie gras mi-cuit, butternut, fruit de la passion, brioche).” >> Read More

    Arnaud Nicolas restaurant and charcuterie in Paris | parisbymouth.com

    Arnaud Nicolas

    At the impossibly young age of 24, Arnaud Nicolas achieved one of the highest honors in gastronomy – the title Meilleur Ouvrier de France (MOF) – for his talent in charcuterie. Fourteen years later, he opened an ambitious shop and restaurant near the Eiffel Tower with the explicit goal of returning charcuterie to a place of honor on the French table. In the same way that prize-winning artisans have reshaped traditional baguette-making and pâtisserie, Nicolas wants to reintroduce charcuterie to palates that have become used to mediocre industrialized examples. So is it really that different? Yes. It’s like tasting chocolate from Patrick Roger when you’ve only ever known Hershey’s, or switching from Kraft singles to raw milk cheese sold by Laurent Dubois.

    Nicolas isn’t the only star charcutier in town (Gilles Verot has a well-deserved following), but he’s the first to build a restaurant around his creations. This could be terrible – I cynically anticipated great charcuterie followed by mediocre mains and forgettable dessert. I was instead delighted by the best Quenelles de Brochet with sauce Nantua that I’ve ever tasted (yes, even in Lyon). The Baba au Rhum is also as good as all the other reviews (see below) say it is. As for the charcuterie, there’s a whole page of options to be taken as starters, ranging from elegant (Pâté en croûte with quail, pear and pistachio) to down-and-dirty (La Couronne de Cochon with all parts of the pig). The wine list is short but includes some very good Beaujolais, which is what you want to be drinking here. The connected shop selling for takeaway is a great source for picnics on the nearby Champ de Mars, and it provides a way to share his creations with my friends who never, ever leave eastern Paris.

    Notable dishes:

    • Charcuterie starters, including different versions of Pâté en croûte
    • Quenelles de Brochet
    • Baba au Rhum for dessert

    Practical Information

    Address: 46 Avenue de la Bourdonnais, 75007
    Hours: Open Tuesday – Saturday for lunch and dinner. Open Monday for dinner only. Closed Sunday. 
    Telephone: 01 45 55 59 59
    Website   Facebook   Instagram

    Arnaud Nicolas in pictures

    What people are saying

  • Alexander Lobrano (2017) tasted two different pâtés en croute and says they “were among the most elegant foods I’ve ever eaten.” He also raves about the head cheese and the pork terrine. “I am besotted with charcuterie in its every iteration, and I don’t think I’ve ever eaten better in my life than what I had at Arnaud Nicolas’s,” concluding that this has “immediately become one of my favorite Paris restaurants.”
  • Le Figaro (2017) compares Nicolas’ creations to fine jewelry, saying that they’re closer in style to the nearby Louboutin and A.P.C. boutiques than to the corner traiteur. Nicolas is ushering in a new age for charcuterie, says Emmanuel Rubin. Oh, and the baba au rhum, prepared to order, is one of the best in the city.
  • Food & Sens (2017) offers another rave review, calling the tourte (a sort of pot pie) with chicken, cabbage and vin jaune “splendid.”
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    Septime

    Septime currently holds the #1 ranking in our list of our favorite Tasting Menus under 100€. First, the bad news: you’re probably not going to get into Septime. Not unless you’re willing to call exactly three weeks before your desired reservation, and probably not even then. I hesitated in keeping Septime at #1 because of this difficulty, and also because my visits in 2015-2016 were fine but not great. However, a return visit in 2017 has left no doubt in my mind that Septime is still the best contemporary tasting menu in Paris. In particular, a dish of lobster with earthy boudin noir and tart wild strawberries provided a mind-bending and delicious jolt to every diner at our table. Beverage pairings are consistently brilliant, leaning heavily toward natural wines but without the ill-chosen funk we often encounter elsewhere. If you can’t get in, don’t despair – any of these other favorite tasting menus will treat you right. You can also visit Septime’s sister restaurant Clamato next door.

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    Le Villaret

    Le Villaret is one of our favorite Classic Bistros in Paris. Sometimes in life we chase after the ones who play hard-to-get and we ignore the nice, stable options who just want to treat us right. Le Villaret is the homely neighborhood bistro that I never appreciated until I stopped looking for love at Le Baratin and Le Repaire de Cartouche. Le Villaret boasts a wine list every bit as interesting, especially if you’re looking for a balanced mix of natural and conventional wines, and bottles are served without the side dish or distain that you’re likely to receive from those popular boys. Wine is definitely the attraction here, so decide first what you want to drink and then find something on the lengthy food menu to pair with your choice. On a recent visit, I pounced on a 2011 Chablis 1er Cru from Raveneau (80€) and enjoyed some lovely if not life-changing monkfish medallions in lobster sauce (30€). There’s also a three-course menu for only 35€, and plenty of moderately priced wines. For people who love wine and want to enjoy a special bottle (or four) and some classic bistro food, Le Villaret is currently one of most reliable options in town. >> Read More

    Le Grand Bain restaurant in Paris | parisbymouth.com

    Le Grand Bain

    Le Grand Bain currently holds the #2 spot in our list of favorite restaurants for small sharable plates.

    I became a fan of chef Edward Delling-Williams when he was cooking at Au Passage, and so I was thrilled when he opened Le Grand Bain on one of the grungiest / coolest streets in Paris. Like at Au Passage, there’s an ever-changing chalkboard menu of small plates, many of them vegetable driven (if not always vegetarian). You’ll also find massive hunks of protein to share. On a recent night, my friend and I competed for the last bite of a beautiful (entire) sole for only 30€, while vowing to return for the whole lamb shoulder that had us drooling on the neighboring table. This delicious drama played out while sitting outside on a street that’s a destination for graffiti tourists. Le Grand Bain is a great place to eat well and to drink natural wine while surrounded by the joyful cacophony of Belleville. >> Read More

    Le Baratin Restaurant in Paris | Paris By Mouth

    Le Baratin

    Food and wine pilgrims, particularly those who read the New York Times or watch Anthony Bourdain, are willing to climb the hill for this Belleville institution. Raquel Carena tends the fire, offering her own personal brand of bistro cooking – sometimes delicate, sometimes hearty, always heartfelt. In stark contrast to the loving kitchen, the dining room is cold as ice, thanks to the joyless leadership of Carena’s husband Philippe. After more than a decade of hopeful visits, I haven’t yet received a smile or any helpful wine guidance from the patron. His cellar is reputed to be one of the best in the city, with an emphasis on independent producers and natural wines. However, he is an unwilling ambassador for these wines and a significant drag on the overall experience. I love Carena’s cooking, but I won’t hurry back because I fear that, once again, I’ll be treated with glaring disinterest by Philippe and the dining room staff who mirror his attitude. For those who really want to try their luck, go at lunch. The dining room, which is harshly over-lit at night, reveals itself beautifully in the sunlight, and the lunch menu for 19 euros remains an incredible deal.
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    Tomy & Co. restaurant in Paris | parisbymouth.com

    Tomy & Co.

    Tomy & Co. currently holds the #1 ranking in our list of favorite Modern & Creative Restaurants in ParisI loved chef Tomy Gousset’s cooking when he was at Pirouette, but this signature restaurant has just blown me away. The room is comfortable and a little plain, which is to say it fits nicely in the 7th arrondissement, but Gousset’s cuisine is thrillingly modern. He is a master of using herbs, acidity and texture to elevate sometimes humble ingredients like beef tongue or tête de veau. His compositions are intricate and colorful, making them a dream for Instagrammers, but flavor and balance are not sacrificed to beauty. Those who like to try different wines will love their list with a rotating cast of 20 selections by the glass. Service is on point and supports, rather than detracts from the brilliance of the kitchen. The menu changes regularly enough to warrant repeat visits, and I for one can’t wait to go back.  >> Read More