Eels

We haven’t yet reviewed this restaurant, but you can scroll down to find the practical information and to read what others are saying about Eels.

Practical Information

Address: 27 Rue d’Hauteville, 75010
Hours: Open Tuesday-Saturday from 12:30-14:00 and from 19:30-22:00.
Telephone: +33 (0)1 42 28 80 20
Website    Online Booking    Facebook   Instagram

What people are saying

  • The Financial Times (2018) Nicholas Lander says that his lunch “delivered everything I look for in a meal anywhere: the kind of hospitality I would expect from someone in their own home combined with ultra-professional cooking of straight-forward ingredients.”
  • Le Monde (2018) François Simon calls this a serene spot, noting that chef Adrien Ferrand undoubtedly earned that characteristic alongside his mentor William Ledeuil from Ze Kitchen Galerie. He calls it a sort of comfort food, with plates that are brilliantly balanced and service that is friendly and efficient.
  • Le Fooding (2017) says that Eels “ticks off all the necessary boxes for a Parisian faubourgeois affaire: polished recipes, well-sourced ingredients, unadulterated wines and zero nonsense.” They rave about a dish of smoked eel with licorice-infused browned butter and the wines selected by Félix le Louarn.
  • Alexander Lobrano (2017) calls Eels the best new table of the rentrée “due to the superbly witty, inventive and assured cooking of chef Adrien Ferrand.” He praises the front-of-house staff for delivering “a flawless and charming service experience around the outstanding cooking of Adrien Ferrand.”
  • L’Express (2017) raves about the signature dish with “small sections of lightly smoked fish, hazelnut butter and hazelnut chips for the roundness, a touch of liquorice for spicy sweetness, shoots of oxalis and green apple for freshness.”
  • L’Entente

    Three cheers to L’Entente founder Oliver Woodhead for having arrived at such an apt name for his curiously dainty, all-day- service “British brasserie” near Opéra. An entente is a diplomatic understanding between nations; any understanding, of course, is what British and French cultures have notably failed to acquire of one another over the last thousand years.

    Dessance

    We’ve visited and will be adding our review soon. In the meantime, you can scroll to see our photos and what others have said about Dessance.

    Practical information

    Address: 74 rue des Archives, 75003
    Nearest transport: Filles du Calvaire (8), Rambuteau (11)
    Hours: Closed Monday & Tuesday; Open Wednesday-Sunday continuously for lunch & dinner
    Telephone: +33 1 42 77 23 62
    Website   Facebook    Instagram

    Dessance in pictures

    Photos by Meg Zimbeck © Paris by Mouth

    What people are saying about Dessance

    David Lebovitz (2015) “Like most experimental food, not everything is a hit. A starter of mustard leaf sorbet that was paired with mirabelle plums and smoked cheese (shown up above) tasted – well…like a frozen puree of mustard leaves. But a grated carrot sorbet with pea puree and pea shoots was excellent. And I loved the ripe strawberries with parsley ice cream and fruit leather that led the way to the final course.”

    The Financial Times (2014) “On a recent visit, the four-course degustation menu began on a savory note – raw tuna paired with tangy orbs of red and white currants, droplets of peach purée, avocado sorbet, and a red onion emulsion that was so good I’d like to suggest they sell it as a condiment.”

    Sugared & Spiced (2014) “This second visit to Dessance was overall a pleasant experience. Some dishes were a bit too much for me in terms of flavor combination, but Dessance still remains an interesting address to visit for its unusual creations. For a change of the Paris sweet scene, why not?”

    The New York Times (2014) “The menu at Dessance doesn’t run toward the pastries, cakes and tarts that a desserts-only concept might imply, but rather offers a small but intriguing collection of dishes that can be eaten as both desserts and main courses, including, for example, a surprising combination of violet-colored vitelotte potato purée with raw and poached apples, arugula and marjoram granité.”

    Le Figaro (2014) “Plutôt convaincante à prouver, par un jeu de compositions biseautées, que l’idée du repas en mode sucré ne se réduit pas au final d’un repas.”

    Table à Découvert (2014) “Le menu ne se substitue pas à un repas (à moins qu’il y ait des adeptes), mais se déguste comme un moment à part, après un plat salé dégusté ailleurs (même s’il y a 2,3 propositions de salées comme des madeleines au roquefort, une assiette de comté, coing et scones ou un foie gras mi-cuit, butternut, fruit de la passion, brioche).”

    Arnaud Nicolas

    At the impossibly young age of 24, Arnaud Nicolas achieved one of the highest honors in gastronomy – the title Meilleur Ouvrier de France (MOF) – for his talent in charcuterie. Fourteen years later, he opened an ambitious shop and restaurant near the Eiffel Tower with the explicit goal of returning charcuterie to a place of honor on the French table. In the same way that prize-winning artisans have reshaped traditional baguette-making and pâtisserie, Nicolas wants to reintroduce charcuterie to palates that have become used to mediocre industrialized examples. So is it really that different? Yes.