Tag Archives: Yves Camdeborde

avant comptoir de lar mer | parisbymouth.com

L’Avant Comptoir de la Mer

Practical information

Address: 3 carrefour de l’Odéon, 75006
Nearest transport: Odéon (4, 10)
Hours: Open every day for lunch & dinner
Reservations: Reservations not accepted
Telephone: 01 42 38 47 55
Average price for lunch: 10-19€
Average price for dinner: 10-19€
Style of cuisine: Seafood & oysters, small plates

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Reviews of interest

Le Figaro (2016) “Poissons, coquillages, crustacés mijotés, marinés, tartinés où Saint-Jean-de-Luz croise le yuzu, la Sardaigne surfe à deux plats du Cap Ferret et l’huître Bloody Mary partage son roulis avec les bulots en mayo wasabi. Il y a du Tokyo et du parigot dans ce grand plongeon. Un océan planqué derrière le bar.”

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L’Avant Comptoir

Push back beyond the crêpe window up front and and you’ll find a convivial and crowded counter packed with elbows, charcuterie boards, communal pickle jars, and wine glasses. It’s standing room only at Yves Camdeborde’s small plates wine bar, a hit since it opened in fall of 2009. Delicious and hearty bites like duck hearts, ham croquettes and boudin noir macarons are washed down with an impressive selection of wines sold by the bottle or the glass. The opening of seafood spinoff L’Avant Comptoir de la Mer next door and, more recently, L’Avant Comptoir de la Marché just a few blocks away has dispersed the devotees throughout the neighborhood. The original remains packed, however, so go during the off hours or be prepared to be get to know the person next to you very, very well.
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Bon Appétit reviews Le Comptoir nine years after it opens

Le Comptoir du Relais (75006) Editor-in-Chief Adam Rapoport acknowledges the (still) impossibility of scoring a reservation at Yves Camdeborde’s restaurant, and then gives it some more much-needed mainstream press coverage. The appeal for him lies in “the restaurant’s bustling, studio-apartment-size space, completely free of pretense in a city famous for pretense,” and the fact that “there is no menu—you eat whatever inventive, abundantly fresh, elevated bistro dishes Camdeborde chooses to cook that evening.” Also, the cheese (much of which comes, we’ve heard, from Twiggy’s place inside the covered Saint-Germain market): “Finally, there is the cheese board, oozing with only-in-France creations (and honey and quince jam and all that good stuff) that your waiter plunks down on the table after your meal and lets you have at it.”

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