Tag Archives: Bistrot Paul Bert

Le Six Paul Bert Restaurant Paris exterior Le 6 Paul Bert

Le 6 Paul Bert

This spot from Bertrand Auboyneau is just a few doors down from his Bistrot Paul Bert, but it’s a world apart in terms of cuisine. The emphasis on good product remains, but Le 6 finds chef Louis-Philippe composing small and modern plates (shaved vegetables, raw and marinated proteins, creative use of dairy) that have more in common with Le Dauphin and Au Passage than a classic Paris bistro. While the wine list is outstanding, and the small plates range in price from only €8-14, don’t mistake this for a drop-in wine bar. It feels like a restaurant, complete with a menu option, and the expected popularity will oblige you to book.

Practical information

Address: 6 rue Paul Bert, 75011
Nearest transport: Charonne (9) or Faidherbe-Chaligny (8)
Hours: Closed Saturday night plus all day Sunday and Monday. Open Saturday until 8pm for epicerie only (charcuterie, sandwiches).
Reservations: Book a few days in advance
Telephone: 01 43 79 14 32
Average price for lunch: €20-34 (small plates from €8-14, menu for €23)
Average price for dinner: €35-49 (small plates from €8-14, menu for €42)
Style of cuisine: wine bar/small plates/tapas

Reviews of interest

François Simon (2013) “Cette fois ci fut la bonne avec ces plats lancés à la volée, parfois à l’emporte pièce mais pleins d’esprit. Atmosphère guillerette, plaisante…  J’aime.”

Aaron Ayscough (2013) “A confident and unshowy command of the intricacies of the small-plates idiom. A typical menu is full of surprises, although perhaps the most surprising facet is how few vegetarian dishes are available.”

Caroline Mignot (2013) “Maquereau fumé, légumes crus et cuits, radis cru, pommes de terre cuites, oignon nouveau bien vinaigré, petit filet d’huile d’olive et branche de je ne sais quoi, ça envoie du peps, c’es frais, c’est délicieux. Hmm l’épaule de porcelet à la peau ultra croustillante sur ses asperges vertes (ah que j’aime le printemps : l’arrivée de l’asperge qui ne me fait pas réfléchir quand je vois son nom sur une carte, c’est elle et c’est tout !), certaines effilées et crus, d’autres cuites fermes, quelques poireaux et feuilles de blette, un fond crémé, miam!”

David Lebovitz (2013) “Everything is absolutely delicious, inventive, and I’ve sat there marveling at the chef and his assistants, quietly cooking and setting up plates of food on the counter, where one of the efficient servers grabs them and takes them to awaiting diners. You just don’t get this kind of food often in Paris… Le 6 Paul Bert is really an exceptional restaurant, with food better than that I’ve had at three-star restaurants, at everyday prices.”

Alexander Lobrano (2013) ” Our first two dishes–my ‘ravioli’ of daikon radish, chopped raw beet, tangerines and oysters in a delightfully gentle citrus vinaigrette, and Bruno’s grilled squid in a herb oil coulis with baby salad leaves were beautifully conceived and intriguingly referenced by the subliminal tidal pools of the collective culinary imagination of young chefs around the world… To wit, these plates exhibited a suave play of acidities and different textures, were sort of raffishly elegant, and packed some powerful pleasure with the freshness of exquisitely sourced produce.”

Le Fooding (2012) “…Et dont on pourra juger de la fibre bistrotière en commandant plusieurs entrées (hareng fumé et rattes à l’aneth, poêlée de foies de volaille aux herbes amères, queue de bœuf en persillade… 5-6 €) à la place de l’unique plat du déjeuner, ou plusieurs plats-entrées à la carte du soir (10-14 €). Cave nature à toute épreuve (Foulards Rouges, L’Anglore, La Sorga, Mosse, Pacalet, Villemade…)”

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bistrot paul bert tarte tatin

Bistrot Paul Bert

The menu at this perennial favorite is seasonally-minded, and a carnivore’s paradise. Not for the faint of heart, or appetite.

An absolute favorite

Practical information

Address: 18 rue Paul Bert, 75011
Nearest transport: Faidherbe-Chaligny (8)
Hours: Closed Sunday and Monday
Reservations: Book a few days in advance
Telephone: 01 43 72 24 01
Average price for lunch: 20-34€
Average price for dinner: 35-49€
Style of cuisine: Classic French

Reviews of interest

Le Figaro (2011) “…rapport simple au produit et ce culte de la gourmandise. Même soin apporté à la terrine de campagne maison qu’aux envolées plus fines (pigeon rôti et petits légumes ; lotte au gingembre…) et aux incontournables, dont le mythique paris-brest.”

Bruno Verjus (2011) “Ici l’on tâte et gâte le gourmand. Alors dérive et file le temps au gré de nourritures terrestres. Les desserts, par leurs énormes tailles créent un rapport d’enfance – tendre prodigalité. Du bon, du très bon, du généreux, un véritable bis trop.”

Patricia Wells (2010) “Last night at one of my favorite little places –Le  Bistrot Paul Bert in the 11th — I adored the addition of thinly sliced raw green asparagus. I’ve always preferred to braise my asparagus, but the earthy flavors of these raw veggies changed my mind!… Worth the journey, for sure.”

David Lebovitz (2010) “…it’s hard to go wrong with anything here. You can order from the fixed price menu or split a Côte de Boeuf (steak for two, which they will not cook further than medium-rare), which includes house made frites.”

Meg Zimbeck via Girls’ Guide to Paris (2010) “For those who are sincere in their desire to taste classic bistro fare, there are few places better than Le Bistrot Paul Bert.”

Alexander Lobrano via David Lebovitz (2009) “This crowded and very popular place is one of my favorite bistros in Paris…”

Barbra Austin (2009) “This one is on many people’s list of favorites, including mine…”

François Simon “Un de mes adresses préférées. Gourmand, puissant avec une carte des vins à perdre la nacre de vos yeux…”

Dorie Greenspan (2008) “…one of my hands-down favorite bistros…”

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Eating & Drinking Around the Aligre Market

The Marché Aligre is a true neighborhood market — so vibrant and bustling that it’s worth even a crosstown trek. Open six days a week, the produce is affordable, the selection diverse, and the vendors highly engaging.

The outdoor stalls that fill the Place d’Aligre and rue d’Aligre are only open in the mornings from 9am-12:30pm. Come afternoon, the streets will be swept clean and you’d never know a market had been there. Fruit, veg and flower prices increase slightly on Saturdays and Sundays, as do the crowds, and the market expands to include vendors on various side streets.

Don’t miss the covered indoor market Marché Beauvau just next door on Place d’Aligre. The prices inside are slightly higher, but you’ll find a range of options including wild game, poultry, cheeses, craft beer and even horse meat. Beauvau is open both in the morning and in the afternoons from 4-7:30pm.

Pre-Market Breakfast & Coffee

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Blé Sucré – One of our absolute favorite croissants in the city. Fabrice Le Bourdat makes some of the most beautiful — and acclaimed — desserts & viennoiserie. You can grab coffee to accompany your baked goods and sit at one of the handful of candy colored tables on the sidewalk outside, or on a bench in the leafy Square Trousseau across the street.

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Café Aouba – Follow the smell of roasting coffee up the rue d’Aligre and elbow your way to the counter at this standing room only café. One of the few local roasters in town, their beans tend to be very darkly roasted and smokey. They have beans, teas, and a variety of jams and honeys for sale, too.

Outdoor Market

aligre flowers

Pezzali Flowers – Located on the corner of Place d’Aligre, right in the center of the market, this flower stall is almost impossible to miss because of the riotous color. Bouquets are reasonably priced and tend to run in 4-10€ range, but prices rise for the weekend market.

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Dridi – Dridi often shows up late and offerings can be sparse during shifting seasons, but the products are entirely local. They usually have a particularly great range of flavorful salad greens including mustard, beet, ficoïde glaciale and l’ail d’ours.  You can find them near the corner of Place d’Aligre just in front of the flea market. Look for the chalkboard that says “Soyons locavores.”

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Bounabi – The vendors at this exotic fruit stand are wonderfully gregarious, not to mention generous with their samples. The quality is usually quite good.

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Aux 4 Saison d’Aligre – You’ll recognize this stand when you see Monsieur Flauhaut, the white haired gentleman with the moustache, hamming it up for the crowd. And there’s usually a crowd.  Look, but don’t touch, and wait your turn for their excellent produce. He’s located just in front of the covered Marché Beauvau.

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Sybille and Remy Costaz – One of the largest stalls in the market that, coincidentally, almost always has the longest line. The produce is displayed like jewels, but wait your turn to be served by the friendly family running the stall. They always have a great selection and very high quality. They are located just in front of the covered Marché Beauvau.

market herbs

herbs

Herb Vendor – The fruits and veg here are “correct” and displayed nicely, but the true draw are the overflowing bunches of herbs available for only 40 centimes. You can locate them directly in front of Le Garde Manger (17 rue d’Aligre, 75012).

Marché Beauvau (Covered Market)

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Michel Brunon – Look for the long line, the sign that says “Ici on viande de cheval” or the giant gold horse’s head on the corner of this butcher shop to get your cut of fresh horse meat. A variety of non-equine meats are available as well, alongside roasted chicken rillettes, sausages, and terrines.

Triperie

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Au Chapon d’Aligre – The giant set of antlers is a good clue as to what this butcher offers– wild game, and lots of it. In winter, the hooks on top of the stall are heaped with game birds. You can always count on a variety of bunnies and a perennially good selection of boutique poultry.

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Boucherie Hayée – Patrick Hayée specializes in pork products, and in particular, suckling pig. We could stand here all day to watch (and smell) the piglets turn round in the giant rotisserie.  You can order one in advance for a party, or occasionally the roasted pig is available by the piece.

Marilou – A charcuterie stand with a riotous range of pâtés and terrines (we like the pâté aux figues and terrine de foie gras aux girolles), air cured ham from Bayonne, Corsica and other corners of France, plus many other regional cured delights.

La Marée Beauvau – It’s always a good sign when you can stand right next to a poissonnerie but cannot smell the fish. The seafood is fresh here and the selection wide. They also offer a traiteur counter with an array of smoked fish, taramas, and cold seafood salads to take home.

pommierPhoto by Camille Malmquist

Pommier – Located just inside the entrance to the covered market at Place d’Aligre, this little beer shop has a solid assortment of Belgian, German, and French craft beers at very low prices.

Sur les Quais – A sweet little épicerie with a good selection of olive oils sold in bulk, jams, spices, charcuterie and some apéro-ready snacks.

Shopping Around the Market

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Japanese Knife Company – 
After 16 years in London, where it was hailed as a “shrine to the knife”, JKC established its first Paris shop in May 2014. It’s already become a magnet for chefs to browse and buy knives and for restaurants to get their kitchen and table knives sharpened.

garde manger

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Le Garde Manger – Visit this lovely Alsatian épicerie at the marché Aligre for specialties like homemade foie gras, choucroute, bretzels, exquisite small-batch jams from Christine Ferber,  plus regional wines and beers. Owner Anne-Françoise Toussaint will happily bake a flammekueche to order (it takes 15 minutes) or send you home with a frozen one to bake yourself.

grain shop

La Graineterie du Marché – The oldest shop in the neighborhood has grain for humans in the front room and grains for birds in the back room. Plus, they keep a few cages of parakeets in the back room alongside garden tools and antique kitchen equipment.

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Sabah – This corner shop at the edge of the outdoor market (behind the potato vendor) has an inexpensive and wide selection of North African & Middle Eastern products (spices, cheeses, dried fruits, nuts, a variety of pulses/legumes, flatbreads) plus a giant olive bar. 140 rue du Faubourg Saint-Antoine, 75012

coeur du marche

Au Coeur du Marché – This small affineur can sometimes get hidden by the all the hustle and bustle of market life just outside, but duck in. The quality is high, the service is friendly (and bilingual), and they will happily sous-vide (vacuum seal) your cheese for travel. Notable offerings include a wide selection of foreign cheeses (quite rare in Paris), goat milk yogurts, and a good variety of butters.

Post-Market Sips and Snacks

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Le Baron Rouge - Join the rest of the neighborhood here on Sunday afternoons for a post-market glass of wine (direct from the barrel), an inexpensive plate of cheese or charcuterie or, in winter, a dozen oysters. Plan to use a car roof or recycling bin as a table if you stay, but carafes or giant plastic containers of wine are available to go, too.

Septime Cave – A bottle shop from the boys behind Septime. Snack options, for those lucky enough to snag a stool or a piece of counter, include pancetta di Colonnata, house-smoked duck breast, anchovies with ricotta, foie gras with smoked eel, with prices ranging from €4-14. This isn’t a restaurant, a place for large groups, or a substitute for Septime, but it is a perfect spot for a high-quality/low-key apéro. Dead cheap glasses from €3-5.

troll cafe photo camille malmquist

Troll Café – Swing by to sample one of over 100 beers (mostly Belgian and bottled) at this relaxed and reasonably priced bar.

Lunch

Boucherie les Provinces - A butcher shop just behind the market where you can purchase meat to take home, or even better, linger onsite to have it cooked to order and served up alongside market fresh sides. No reservations so come early on the weekends or be prepared for a lengthy wait.

clamato

Clamato – Small plates seafood is the name of the game at this no reservations joint from Bertrand Grébaut. Open only for lunch on Saturdays and Sundays.

Will – A brand new restaurant from globe trotting chef William Pradeleix who has worked in London under Hélène Darroze, in Bora Bora with Jean-Georges Vongerichten, and most recently, headed up the kitchen at Manger. His precise, Asian-inflected cuisine is a draw.

Table – Writer Bruno Verjus’ restaurant features a limited menu of excellently sourced meat, fish, and produce that is roasted simply on a spit. While the prices at dinner have raised a few eyebrows, the “menu express” at lunchtime is a great value for 29€.

Caffé dei Cioppi – Almost universally adored, this tiny spot, hidden from the street, is the Italian restaurant everyone wishes were in their neighborhood. Plan ahead for this one as booking is imperative.

Pizza dei Cioppi – The much adored and hard to book Caffé dei Cioppi has branched out into pizza with pleasing results. The long, rectangular pizza with a springy foccacia base is available by the slice.

Les Déserteurs – Service is painfully slow at this new place in the old Rino space, and it’s more of a splurge at lunch for 35€, but the modern, product focused cuisine is delicious.

La Gazzetta – Revamped after Petter Nilsson’s departure with a new chef recently arrived from Rome, the lunch menu remains an excellent value at 19€.

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Bistrot Paul Bert – The menu at this perennial favorite is seasonally-minded, and a carnivore’s paradise. Not for the faint of heart, or appetite.

Le 6 Paul Bert – This spot from Bertrand Auboyneau is just a few doors down from his Bistrot Paul Bert, but it’s a world apart in terms of cuisine. The emphasis on good product remains, but Le 6 has small and modern plates (shaved vegetables, raw and marinated proteins, creative use of dairy).

Retro’Bottega – This little Italian épicerie-à-manger, run by the former sommelier at Rino, has four tables — two in and two out — where you can eat surrounded by exquisite spices, olive oils, and stacks of wine.

Pink Flamingo – “Pas comme les autres,” is the motto at kitschy cool Pink Flamingo Pizza. Take-out and delivery available at all locations.

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