Tag Archives: Iñaki Aizpitarte

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Le Cave

A wine shop from the restaurant Le Chateaubriand, driven by the passion of sommelier Sébastien Chatillon for natural, rare and foreign wines.

Practical information

Address: 129 avenue Parmentier, 75011
Nearest transport: Goncourt (line 11)
Hours: Open Tuesday-Saturday from 2-10pm. Closed Sunday and Monday
Telephone: 01 48 74 65 38
Facebook

Reviews of interest

Aaron Ayscough (2014) “Food is sold to-go, but no food is available for consumption on premises… Yet a rotating cast of the shop’s exotic, borderline faddish wines are available by the glass… The wines actually displayed on Le Cave’s walls are precisely the same ones available at, say… any hip Paris restaurant with a young, curious somm who is nonetheless handcuffed by the limited amount of good non-French natural wines that make it into France.”

Blouin ArtInfo (2013) “On pourra ici découvrir toute une gastronomie autant qu’une poésie de noms de lieux (Céphalonie, Santorin, Conca de Barbera, Swartland, Géorgie…), de noms de cépages (aleatico, ribolla gialla, mavrotragano, rkatsiteli, zacinjak), ainsi que des histoires fantastiques de popes qui font des vins depuis 1000 ans, de soleras de saké, de vinification en amphore ou de vins blancs faits comme des rouges.”

Photo via Le Cave’s Facebook page

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Le Chateaubriand restaurant in Paris | parisbymouth

Le Chateaubriand

You can only reserve for the first seating at Le Chateaubriand. After that, you’ll have to wait in line with everyone else for a stab at Iñaki Aizpitarte’s unique menu, a parade of forgotten vegetables, fish, and meat (some raw, some cooked) that landed the restaurant on San Pellegrino’s 50 Best list last year.

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Le Dauphin wine bar in Paris | parisbymouth.com

Le Dauphin

This wine bar next door to (and run by) Le Chateaubriand boasts food by Inaki Aizpitarte, a smooth marble design by Rem Koolhaas and Clement Blanchet, and a great selection of affordable vins naturels.

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CaveChateaubriand

Chateaubriand to open a wine shop

CaveChateaubriand Following in the footsteps of Septime, and (once-upon a time) Spring, the hard-to-book Paris restaurant Le Chateaubriand has acquired a space for an eventual wine shop between the restaurant and its sister wine bar Le Dauphin. Word on the street is that it will focus on interesting imports.

No details yet on when the shop will open, or whether they’ll sell to-go bottles for the hordes lined up on the sidewalk waiting to get into Le Chateaubriand. We’ll keep you posted…

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#9 Le Chateaubriand by Meg Zimbeck

Paris Rankings Among the World’s 50 Best Restos

The 2011 Pellegrino World’s 50 Best Restaurant Awards

Whether you love them, hate them, or (like Ferran Adrià) just think they need a little reform, the annual rankings were revealed tonight in London. We were nerdy enough to watch the live streaming event in our pyjamas and to post the play-by-play on our Facebook page. Rene Redzepi’s restaurant Noma retained the #1 spot, followed by two Spanish restaurants, El Celler De Can Roca and Mugaritz. The highest ranked Paris restaurant was Le Chateaubriand, which broke the the top ten for the first time this year.

Paris Results

Among the Paris rankings, there are some very different stories. Le Chateaubriand, which broke the top ten for the first time this year (and is the only French restaurant to do so) has been rising dramatically since its entry in 2009. Pierre Gagnaire, on the other hand, has steadily slipping ever since its highest point at #3 in 2008. L’Astrance, L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon and L’Arpège are all on a comeback kick, while Alain Ducasse has been tumbling consistently down in the rankings. Anne-Sophie Pic was named as the World’s Best Female Chef, but her restaurant (Maison Pic, Valence) didn’t make the top 50. Also ranked in the second tier was Le Meurice, squeaking in at #97.

So how do we explain the fact that Le Chateaubriand and L’Arpège are rising while Ducasse and Gagnaire are slipping? And what about all those three-star Michelin chefs (Frechon, Alleno, Savoy) who didn’t make the cut? What does it mean that David Chang’s noodle bar outranks the founder of the Collège Culinaire de France?

Full Results

  1. Noma, Denmark
  2. El Celler de Can Roca, Spain
  3. Mugaritz, Spain
  4. Osteria Francescana, Italy
  5. The Fat Duck, UK
  6. Alinea, USA
  7. D.O.M, Brazil
  8. Arzak, Spain
  9. Le Chateaubriand, France
  10. Per Se, USA
  11. Daniel, USA
  12. Les Creations de Narisawa, Japan
  13. L’Astrance, France
  14. L’Atelier de Joel Robuchon, France
  15. Hof van Cleve, Belgium
  16. Pierre Gagnaire, France
  17. Oud Sluis, Netherlands
  18. Le Bernardin, USA
  19. L’Arpege, France
  20. Nihonryori RyuGin, Japan
  21. Vendome, Germany
  22. Steirereck, Austria
  23. Schloss Schauenstein, Switzerland
  24. Eleven Madison Park, USA (second highest climber)
  25. Aqua, Germany
  26. Quay, Australia
  27. Iggy’s, Singapore
  28. Combal Zero, Italy
  29. Martin Berasategui, Spain
  30. Bras, France
  31. Biko, Mexico
  32. Le Calandre, Italy
  33. Cracco, Italy
  34. The Ledbury, UK (highest new entry)
  35. Chez Dominique, Finland
  36. Le Quartier Francais, South Africa
  37. Amber, China
  38. Dal Pescatore, Italy
  39. Il Canto, Italy
  40. Momofuku Ssam Bar, USA
  41. St John, UK
  42. Astrid Y Gaston, Peru
  43. Hibiscus, UK
  44. Maison Troisgros, France
  45. Alain Ducasse au Plaza Athenee, France
  46. De Librije, Netherlands
  47. Restaurant de l’Hotel de Ville, Switzerland
  48. Varvary, Russia
  49. Pujol, Mexico
  50. Asador Etxebarri, Spain

 

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