Category Archives: Chinese

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Ravioli Chinois Nord-Est

You’re not here for the bare-bones space or the bare-bones service, you’re here for the fresh dumplings, pure and simple. They’re cheap, abundant, and most importantly, good.

There are usually 10 varieties on the menu including beef and turnip, pork and celery, shrimp & chive, and a great vegetarian mushroom option, all priced around €5 for a plate of 10, and served either grilled or boiled. The cucumber, peanut or noodle side salads are a good complement. Space inside is cramped, so plan on a short wait for a table, and don’t let the length of the queue put you off: Most are waiting for their goods to-go, no surprise when 100 frozen dumplings can be purchased for as little as €20.

— Catherine Down, January 2016

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Chicken bao burger at Siseng in Paris | parisbymouth.com

Siseng

Burgers are ubiquitous in Paris, but the unique ones at Siseng are worth seeking out. The house specialty is bao burgers: five spiced beef patties with tamarind and tempura onion or a crispy chicken filet with coconut milk & basil on steamed Chinese buns. It’s pan-asian fusion that (mostly) works. Cocktails & sides were uneven. Crunchy risotto balls infused with a lingering lemongrass flavor were a surprising success while the sweet potato fries could have stood another round in the fryer. An evening visit on a weekend found the tiny, Canal-side space slammed with a young, international crowd, but service stayed funny & warm under pressure albeit somewhat forgetful. There are no reservations so it’s better to go in small groups and be prepared to wait.

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bao at Yam T'cha in Paris | parisbymouth.combao at Yam T'cha in Paris | parisbymouth.com

Boutique Yam’Tcha

In late 2014, Yam’Tcha (the restaurant) moved and its  former space converted into a tea salon and to-go window selling delicious steamed buns (bao). Adeline Grattard’s Franco-Chinois take on les brioches vapeur includes fillings like Comté with sweet onion, Basque pork with Szechuan eggplant, shrimp with gauchoï, spicy shiitake & veg, and surprising bite of Stilton with Amarena cherry. Pick up a single bun for 3-4€ or get an assortment of 5 for 16€. They’ll steam them on-site for you, or you can take them home and steam them yourselves in 3-5 minutes. They’re also selling bottles of house-made XO sauce in three varieties, plus tea for drinking on site or making at home.  >> Read More

Shang Palace Cantonese restaurant in Paris | parisbymouth.com

Shang Palace

Practical information

Address: 10 avenue Iéna (in the Shangri-La hotel), 75016
Nearest transport: Iéna (9)
Hours: Closed Tuesday & Wednesday; Open Thursday-Monday for lunch and dinner
Reservations: Book a week or two in advance
Telephone: 01 53 67 19 92
Average price for lunch: 52€ or 78€
Average price for dinner: More than 100€
Style of cuisine: Chinese, Haute cuisine
Website   Facebook   Book Online

Reviews of interest

Figaroscope (2015) “En provenance directe de Canton, nouveau chef pour la table chinoise du palace. Et la cuisine de suivre un ton plus aigu, enrichie d’inédits et toujours aussi minutieuse à révéler ses classiques.”

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Likafo restaurant in Paris via Facebook | parisbymouth.com

Likafo

Practical information

Address: 39 avenue de Choisy, 75013
Nearest transport: Maison Blanche (7)
Hours: Open every day 12pm-midnight
Reservations: Walk-Ins Welcome
Telephone: 01 45 84 20 45
Average price for lunch: €10-19
Average price for dinner: €10-19
Style of cuisine: Chinese
Facebook

Reviews of interest

Chez Ptipois (2012) “…un des meilleurs cantonais de Paris sinon le meilleur…très séduit par ce porc haché cuit à la vapeur avec une garniture de maquereau salé-fermenté…Tendre, onctueux, savoureux mais éminemment corsé…”

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Tricotin restaurant in Paris | parisbymouth.com

Tricotin

Practical information

Address: 15 avenue de Choisy, 75013
Nearest transport: Porte de Choisy (7, T3)
Hours: Open every day 9am-11pm
Reservations: Walk-Ins Welcome
Telephone: 01 45 84 74 44
Average price for lunch: 10-19€
Average price for dinner: 10-19€
Style of cuisine: Chinese

Reviews of interest

Hipsters in Paris (2015) “Basically its busy, vibrant, disorganised, inexpensive and (usually) delicious. Go in with reasonable expectations about the service and decor and you will exit supremely satisfied.”

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Les Delices de Shandong

Practical information

Address: 88 boulevard de l’Hôpital, 75013
Nearest transport: Campo Formio (5)
Hours: Closed Wednesday; Open Thursday-Tuesday for lunch & dinner
Reservations: Walk-ins Welcome
Telephone: 01 45 87 23 37
Average price for lunch: 10-19€
Average price for dinner: 20-39€
Style of cuisine: Chinese
Website

Reviews of interest

Alexander Lobrano (2012) “I’d say that if you were only going to go to a single Chinese restaurant in Paris, it should be Les Delices de Shandong…”

L’Express (2011) “… anguille ou crabe sautéau piment, soupe de raie mijotée et tofu, vermicelles au porc mijoté, raviolis vapeur aux légumes, au porc, au boeuf ou aux crevettes… Les mets jouent l’équilibre parfait entre exotisme et authenticité, dépaysement et excellence…”

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Shan Gout Restaurant in Paris | Paris By Mouth

Shan Goût

This tiny, highly regarded Chinese restaurant veers from the usual family style format, offering a limited-choice, three-course menu.

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Mapo Tofu at Deux Fois Plus de Piment restaurant in Paris | parisbymouth.com

Deux Fois Plus de Piment

This is one Chinese spot that doesn’t cater to the French palate. There are signs above the cash register that attest to this fact and warn about the potential gastronomic woes that could ensue after eating the pepper-laden Szechuan fare. Whether it’s soft Mapo tofu with crumbly pork bits or cold, sesame soaked cucumber salad, everything is slicked in fire oil, with an emphasis on the oil. I like this inexpensive, informal joint all the same (or perhaps because of it). Pork raviolis & spicy cabbage are two perennial favorites, and the broccoli with garlic provides a nice respite from the burn. You can choose your own heat level on a scale of 1-5 on most dishes. Level 3 is usually tongue-searingly warm enough for a spice lover. The restaurant is quite small so a larger group should plan to either eat early, book ahead, or take it to-go.   >> Read More