Pompette

Pompette is a small plates restaurant boasting a natural wine list from Australian sommelière Jess Hodges. Chef Jordan Robinson’s modest menu is mostly pescatarian with international and North American influences ranging from curry-spiked cockles to fried chicken with white barbecue sauce. Reservations are a must, whether for one of the 28 indoor seats or the dozen on the terrace.

Jacques Genin

Madman Jacques Genin crafts some of the city’s most exquisite chocolate, but he’s almost equally known for his caramels and pâtes de fruits. You might mistake his shop in the northern Marais for a luxury jeweler. The airy space is filled with stunning floral arrangements and white-gloved assistants assembling chocolate boxes. Favorite chocolates include the menthe fraîche (fresh mint), the noisette-feuilleté (crispy hazelnut praline) and fève tonka (tonka bean). The mango-passion fruit caramels are stunning, but we love his anything-but-plain nature version. Expect his pâtes de fruits to change with the seasons, but keep an eye out for orange sanguine (blood orange) in winter and berry flavors like fraise and framboise (strawberry and raspberry) in summer. 

Le Servan

Tatiana Levha, formerly at L’Arpège and L’Astrance, and her sister Katia opened this light, airy bistro with a central bar & hand painted ceiling. The short list of offerings changes each day, but expect seasonally driven cuisine inflected with international touches like tandoori spiced beurre blanc atop asparagus or harissa to spice up the line caught hake. Dessert left room for improvement, but otherwise Le Servan had reasonably priced, expertly executed dishes and friendly service in a beautiful space.

Les Enfants du Marché

Les Enfants du Marché, a modern & creative restaurant located within the open-air Marché des Enfants Rouges market in the upper Marais, is a dining counter known for natural wine and avant-garde cuisine. While the seating on bar stools in the bustling market might suggest a more lowbrow offering, the surprising combinations on Japanese chef Masahide Ikuta’s unforgettable plates evoke a far more fine dining affair (an evocation reflected in the highbrow prices). It is one of our favorite Paris restaurants.

Abri

We have never been disappointed by the excellent modern bistronomy at Abri, but the only way that we have been able to go in the last year has been when someone else had a reservation they couldn’t use. No, they will not answer their phone. No, there is no secret strategy. Even if you go in person and ask for a reservation, any reservation, at lunch or dinner for any number of people at any time in the future, the answer will be no. So take it off your list, it’s not a functional restaurant if you can’t ever go.

Ma Cave Fleury

Inexpensive couples of quality grower’s champagne served on a nice outdoor terrace overlooking… a gritty street lined with sex clubs and prostitutes. It’s quite a combo. The charcuterie and cheese plates are standard, but it’s the warm, witty personality of the proprietor and former comedienne Morgane Fleury that is the main draw for those looking for affordable, natural wine.

Experimental Cocktail Club

The original (and still insanely popular) speakeasy that sparked the trend in 2007 and spawned an empire that now includes Beef Club, Fish Club, Prescription Cocktail Club and Curio Parlour. ECC sets the standard for tiny, dark and cozy bars with their intricate cocktails. Despite being the oldest of the new wave joints, it’s still one of the swankiest and hardest to get in.

Harry’s New York Bar

Famous for being a Hemingway haunt, Harry’s is responsible for the invention of the (now) classic cocktails the Bloody Mary, the French 75, and the Sidecar. Stiff, white coat clad bartenders keep a strict dress code in check so shorts aren’t going to cut it. Pants (sigh) are required if you’d like to make it through the door of this historic bar.