Category Archives: Specialty Shops

Le Bel Ordinaire in Paris | parisbymouth.com

Le Bel Ordinaire

We have not yet visited Le Bel Ordinaire, which combines an épicerie (grocery and wine shop) with a wine bar and cave à manger. Scroll down to read some of the early reviews.

Practical Information

Address: 54 Rue de Paradis, 75010
Hours: Closed Sunday & Monday. Open for lunch & dinner Tuesday-Saturday. 
Telephone01 46 27 46 67
Website   Facebook   Instagram

What people are saying

  • Le Fooding (2017) appreciates the selection of natural wines but say that “there were some ups and downs the day we went for lunch, seated around the lone, long oak table… overcooked penne with leeks and haddock; Morteau sausage couscous with hints of butternut squash and daikon radish, seasoned with a spellbinding veal-harissa broth.”
  • TimeOut (2017) raves about the silky œufs mayo, the plump duck croquettes with Chinese cabbage, and a delicious but overpriced minestrone of vegetables with stracciatella. They find the to-go groceries, particularly the cheese, to be overpriced as well.
  • Atabula (2017) interviews Sébastien Demorand, who explains that many of their products come from his sourcing work for the failed Jeune Rue project, including the vinegars of Laurent Agnès and duck from Basque producer Jean Michel Berho. He also shares his hope to open another Bel Ordinaire in the 17th arrondissement.
  • Le Figaro (2017) calls this one of the best tables for Summer 2017 and says not to miss the salade piémontaise.
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    Le Zingam

    It appears to be run by bike messengers,” was what a friend said of charming, wood-paneled épicerie and greengrocer Le Zingam when it opened by Voltaire in 2014. And lo, indeed it is. But who says bike messengers can’t also have impeccable taste and wallet-friendly politics?

    Longtime friends from the neighborhood Lelio Stettin and Sonny Lac offer rigorously-selected vegetables, cheeses, meats, eggs, craft beers, organic and natural wines, and tinned preserves – all of opulent quality at quasi-socialist prices. Lac formerly worked nearby at the quaint wine-bistrot Mélac, and his wine selection at Le Zingam is honest and simple, geared towards casual refreshment over geek reverence. The shop’s product selection overall is a work of low-key brilliance – from tomme de chevre to pancetta to yogurt pots, Le Zingam’s selections are laser-targeted to invite wholesale adoption into one’s habitual home meals. For any Parisians perturbed by the slow transformation of quality foodstuffs into luxuries in their city, Le Zingam – discerning, refined, and unpretentious – is a godsend.

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    Fine l’Épicerie de Belleville

    Founded in 2010 on rue de Tourtille, Cécile Boussarie’s gourmet food and wine shop moved around the corner in 2014 to its current, more prominent rue de Belleville location. Its bold, clean red sign belies the unpolished dowdiness of the shop’s interior, where teas, jams, vinegars, spices, potted meats, conserves, oils, and assorted trinkets line all available surfaces. In the middle of über-urban Belleville, it’s like walking into a deserted village gift shop.

    At midday, Fine L’Épicerie de Belleville offers soups and sandwiches enjoyably enlivened with various low-key delicacies (dry Sicilian caper sausage, say, or spiced confit grape cream). Tables in the shop’s deep interior are a refuge from the street for lunchtime diners and the odd professional meeting. Along with cheese and charcuterie, Boussarie stocks a slightly haphazard range of inexpensive natural wine and craft beer. While not a tastemaking authority by any means, Fine L’Épicerie de Belleville remains a handy back-pocket address for things to bring to last-minute weeknight dinner parties and relatives’ birthday brunches.

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    Ô Divin Epicerie

    Naoufel Zaïm earned the loyalty of foodies willing to go the (literal) extra mile with his far-flung former Buttes Chaumont restaurant Ô Divin. That restaurant has closed and converted to table d’hôte service, available only for privatization upon demand. But one can still enjoy Zaïm’s winning hospitality, his sharp taste in natural wine, and his instinct for simplicity at Ô Divin Epicerie, his gem-stacked gourmet shop high on rue de Belleville. Chef Paul Houet offers a menagerie of meat products, all prepared in-house, from rillettes to merguez sausage to a variety of terrines. The wine selection includes some sought-after names and surpasses any other épicerie in the city both for value and quality. Sandwiches with sterling ingredients and the occasional prepared hot dish are available for take-out. And jostling for the rest of the shop’s limited space are Italian cheeses, artisanal olive oils, local honey, gourmet salt, canned meats, and all the other accoutrements of eating well. For those not lucky enough to live nearby, it’s worth the hike up rue de Belleville.

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    prosciutto sandwich mmmozza via fb | parisbymouth.com

    Mmmozza

    Mmmozza has one of the bbbest selections of mozzarella that you’ll find in the city, ranging from tiny bocconcini, to a  baseball-sized burrata stuffed with black truffles, to an enormous braided rope of bufala mozzarella, hacked off by the slice. The skinny sliver of an Italian specialty shop has lines out the door at lunch for its messy, affordable sandwiches featuring fresh mozzarella, cured meats and vegetables, and arugula. When the weather is nice, there’s outdoor seating or you can chow down in the Square du Temple park directly opposite. A variety of imported prosciuttos and salamis, stuffed pastas, oils and vinegars, and a small but quality range of Italian wines are also available for purchase.

    — Catherine Down, January 2016

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    agnolotti pastificio passerini | parisbymouth.com

    Pastificio Passerini

    We have not yet reviewed this shop, but you can read more about the concept here. You’ll find practical information about location and hours on this page, along with links to other reviews. Feel free to share your own opinion in the comments.

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    maison plisson photo via FB | parisbymouth.com

    Maison Plisson

    This sprawling 500m² space on the edge of the trendy Northern Marais does double duty. On one side, it’s an upscale market, boasting fresh fruits and vegetables, high quality cheeses, charcuterie, and deli items, as well as a bakery, an excellent selection of wines and a range of luxury local and imported grocery items. On the other, it’s a café, serving a small range of dishes made from ingredients sold next door. In a neighborhood surprisingly devoid of good grocery purveyors, the store is a revelation: The boulangerie turns out the best croissants for several blocks, the charcuterie is excellent and this is the go-to spot for top-notch pickles or proper English tea. With the Bastille market just around the corner customers might balk at the price of produce here, but if only kale will do, this is the store for you. In the café, the concise lunch menu offers very good – if overpriced – simple French classics. At a lower price point, and for smaller appetites, there’s also a nice selection of quiches, tartines and sandwiches.

    — Emily Brookes, November 2015

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    Boucherie Les Provinces butcher shop in Paris photo via FB | parisbymouth.com

    Boucherie Les Provinces

    Practical information

    Address: 20 rue d’Aligre, 75012
    Nearest transport: Ledru-Rollin (8)
    Hours: Closed Monday; Open Tuesday-Sunday for lunch; Open Thursday & Friday for lunch and dinner
    Reservations: Reservations not accepted,  but the restaurant can be booked for private parties at night
    Telephone: 01 43 43 91 64
    Average price for lunch: 20-39€
    Average price for dinner: 20-39€
    Style of cuisine: Rotisserie, Classic French
    Website   Facebook

    Reviews of interest

    David Lebovitz (2014) “At boucherie Les Provinces, you won’t be blown away by the food, but you’ll have a good time, as we did, digging into our onglet steaks… While you likely won’t find Les Provinces listed in restaurant guides as a place to cross town for, I can’t think of a better way to spend a day in Paris than strolling around the Aligre market… before diving into a couple of steaks while knocking back a few glasses of red in the convivial atmosphere of boucherie Les Provinces.”

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    Terroirs d’Avenir

    Even if you haven’t been to Terroirs d’Avenir yet, odds are you’ve still tried one of their products. Alexandre Drouard and Samuel Nahon started Terroirs d’Avenir in 2008 to bring exceptional French products from small producers to Paris restaurants, revolutionizing our city’s dining scene along the way. After building a devoted clientele of chefs (among others: Daniel Rose (Spring), Braden Perkins (Verjus) and their current neighbor on the Rue de Nil, Grégory Marchand (Frenchie), Alexandre and Samuel opened the Terroirs d’Avenir shops in 2013. >> Read More

    Bellota-Bellota

    Practical information

    Address: 18 rue Jean-Nicot, 75007
    Nearest transport: La Tour Maubourg (8)
    Hours: Closed Sunday and Monday; Open Tuesday-Saturday all day
    Reservations: Walk-ins Welcome
    Telephone: 01 53 59 96 96
    Average price for lunch: 20-39€
    Average price for dinner: 20-39€
    Style of cuisine: Spanish, small plates
    Website   Facebook

    Additional Locations

    Address: 11 rue Clément Marot, 75008
    Nearest transport: Alma – Marceau (9)
    Hours: Closed Sunday; Open Monday-Saturday all day
    Reservations: Walk-ins Welcome
    Telephone: 01 47 20 03 13

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    Le Garde Manger

    Visit this lovely Alsatian épicerie at the marché Aligre for specialties like flammenkuchen, bretzels and foie gras, plus regional wines and beers.

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    La Caféothèque

    Beans are roasted right before your eyes at this excellent coffee boutique. Take a bag home, or take a seat in the back room and order a drink from the expert barista.

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    Verlet

    In business since 1880, Verlet roasts and sells single origin coffee beans, house blends, and fine teas, with a salon for on-the-spot drinking upstairs.

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    Julhès

    In the heart of the colorful rue Faubourg Saint-Denis, this full service traiteur has an excellent cheese department, and boasts an impressive collection of Champagnes, whiskies, and other spirits.

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    Fauchon

    One of the most recognizeable gourmet food brands in the world, with a sprawling shop selling all manner of condiments, chocolates, plus a pâtisserie and café.

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    Le Couteau d’Argent

    This butcher shop in Asnieres is where self-proclaimed "meilleure boucher du monde" Yves-Marie Le Bourdonnec plies his trade. Call in advance (and save your centimes) if you want his famous, dry-aged côte de boeuf.

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    Hugo Desnoyer

    Hugo Desnoyer is the meat man for some of the city’s top tables, but he still runs a retail shop, one of the great butcher shops in the city.

    >> Read More